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Welders and Welding Which welder is best and the best way's to use them.


Welders and Welding Which welder is best and the best way's to use them.

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  #1  
Old 01-30-2010, 10:57 PM
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Roll Cage MIG Welding technique.

Ive been welding for a while now, so Ive got the basics down and feel confident that I can produce good clean welds. But Ive never built a cage before, and I'm going to be adding some more supports to an existing cage soon.

I was wondering if theres any tips, pointers, preferred techniques for welding on tubing? it will be the usual 1.75 .120 DOM with a millermatic 180 75/25.


push? pull? circles, "C" patterns?

( i searched on here, but didn't find anything, so feel free to point out older threads)

Matt
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  #2  
Old 01-31-2010, 01:03 AM
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Get some tube and do it.
I like "C's" and I pull...
Except when I push...
And sometimes...

You will encounter every single out of position situation ever talked about in the books and a few that they had never seen, building cages...
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Old 01-31-2010, 01:05 AM
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check out ZTFABs work totally insane same with Matt Helton on race dezert , and ya lots of practice also some guys use a smaller wire to allow them time to build the puddle


http://www.race-dezert.com/forum/showthread.php?t=59124

check out this site as well a different level of fab work when compared to here , but very knowledgeable guys and willing to share much like the crew on here

Last edited by mikefrombc; 01-31-2010 at 01:08 AM.
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Old 01-31-2010, 01:13 AM
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Maybe try the smaller wire 0.024/5 - you can go slower and gives you time.

EDIT - and, when cutting the "stick-out" to the proper length, snip it at an angle to create a needle point - helps a bit for a cleaner start. This obviously isnt specific to just doing cages/tubes...

Last edited by IZwack; 01-31-2010 at 01:17 AM.
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Old 01-31-2010, 01:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by entropy View Post
...You will encounter every single out of position situation ever talked about in the books and a few that they had never seen, building cages...
I will agree with this one..... To add... Push, Pull or drag... follow a constant...


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Old 01-31-2010, 02:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IZwack View Post
Maybe try the smaller wire 0.024/5 - you can go slower and gives you time.

EDIT - and, when cutting the "stick-out" to the proper length, snip it at an angle to create a needle point - helps a bit for a cleaner start. This obviously isnt specific to just doing cages/tubes...
I accually don't understand this.. Sorry .... Is it because of the welder size ??


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Old 01-31-2010, 02:39 AM
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Cool, thanks guys.

It seems to me that the smaller the wire, the less filler metal is deposited (at the same wire speed) as a larger wire. Thus it takes longer to form the weld puddle, allowing you to go slower.

Atleast that's how I interpret it!
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Old 01-31-2010, 02:56 AM
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Red face

Most important be comfortable and be able to see what you are doing .

I don`t know about this cutting of wire either . I had heard something a long time ago . Had something to do with the wire cooling out of the inert gas shielding

Can you just see cutting your wire every time you stopped welding . It would give the foreman a heart attack in some of the places I go.
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Old 01-31-2010, 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by wyoming9 View Post
.. I don`t know about this cutting of wire either . I had heard something a long time ago . Had something to do with the wire cooling out of the inert gas shielding ...
Id say snipping is important with alum feed.. not so much steel wire .. unless I'm cleaning nozzel I will not snip.. If you end your weld feed proper .. there should be no need...


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Old 01-31-2010, 10:47 AM
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Sorry for the late response.

Cutting the wire (which is typically just taking off like 1/8" of an inch) to a needle point starts the wire melting/"burning" faster than a blunt ended one - which I find useful for small wire diameters and cold metal.

Looking at the other end of the spectrum would be a ball end with a diameter much larger than the wire diameter. Regardless as to why the user ended up with this ball-end, obviously it would be more difficult to start a clean weld with such a tip.

EDIT - I've seen this referenced from a few places but here's one:
Lincoln Electric - scroll down to the bottom to #6 of "Tips for All":
http://www.lincolnelectric.com/knowl...sfluxcored.asp

Last edited by IZwack; 01-31-2010 at 10:52 AM.
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  #11  
Old 01-31-2010, 11:19 AM
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I've heard about cutting the wire to a point several times before. I do it once and a while for a faster/ cleaner start like IZwack said.

I think ill go buy some smaller wire (running .030) and a few feet of cheap HREW to practice with
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Old 01-31-2010, 11:56 AM
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i wouldn't personally recomend using the smaller wire. you shouldn't be having to weld too fast with the .030. i use .035 and i wish it was faster. at work i use .072 larger, now that's welding fast!

the biggest suggestion i can make that no one seemed to mention was joint fit up. TAKE YOUR TIME make those joints TIGHT and bevel your edges, this will make welding much easier. ifyhou get excieted and just call slap some tube in there you will be filling gaps and that is what will make your welds poor and a pain in the ace to weld up properly. also clean the material to the point you would make love to it! i hit the weld connections with a soft (flapper) wheel, then with a polish pad to give it that shine. that will make your welds that much better
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Old 01-31-2010, 02:22 PM
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I personally like the smaller wire too for hobby use because I can travel slower. When I use bigger wire I sometimes move too quickly and end up losing my concentration. I think no matter what wire, orientation, or material you're welding, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to focus and really think before and during the weld. I have also found a phantom/practice pass around the joint goes a long way towards a quality weld. It forces you to think beforehand about how you need to position yourself, which directions to rotate the gun, and where you should stop welding and reposition before continuing.

I am an amatuer welder at best, but this basic concept of actively thinking about and planning my movements for making something has been invaluable for many of the processes I tackle in my shop.

I would love to hear peoples suggestions for getting into tight or unseeable places with a MIG.
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Old 01-31-2010, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post

I would love to hear peoples suggestions for getting into tight or unseeable places with a MIG.
The long and short of it is the joint should have been redesigned!

That said a smaller size gun, higher gas flow and gas dams, a mirror, dead sweep the joint a few times so that you know how to sweep the gun then weld by ear & muscle memory.

E
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  #15  
Old 01-31-2010, 05:06 PM
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Well, I'm like Balter in a sence, I use only 035 as a light industrial fab shop, I may step up to 045 or 045 flux if doing alot of heavier weld worx other than that I couldn't use smaller wire unless for thinner sheet metal, 'maybe' hehe..

Bandit mentioned tight spots... I mainly use 1/2" orfice nozzels, if i find getting a bit far away than my norm, I pull a Frank Zappa and crank all knobs up a smiggin and in some spots may have to do an extra pass to fill...


Cheer'z


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Old 01-31-2010, 08:59 PM
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on my jeep i couldn't run beads on the top of the upper link xmember. so instead i just added an uber gusset and caulked the top, should be stronger then having that top 2" section welded and it will keep it water proof
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