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Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.


Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.

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  #1  
Old 10-30-2009, 07:57 PM
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crawlin91 crawlin91 is offline
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Schools for fabrication?

More and more lately I have been looking at taking some classes for metal fabrication, chassis building, engines, machine work etc. either to increase my skills as a 4x4builder or as a carreer in the off road industry. I am definately leaning towards serioustly doing this for a living.......and I was wondering what recommendations those of you may have who already do this for a living or have taken some instruction in any of the above fields would have.

what types of classes to take?
What are the best schools?
Whats the job like on a daily basis?
Do you enjoy what you do?
or any other info or advice you might have for a beginning fabricator looking to get further knowledge and skills, such as other websites, books, anything.

Thanks guys.
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  #2  
Old 10-31-2009, 11:32 AM
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entropy entropy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crawlin91 View Post
More and more lately I have been looking at taking some classes for metal fabrication, chassis building, engines, machine work etc. either to increase my skills as a 4x4builder or as a carreer in the off road industry. I am definately leaning towards serioustly doing this for a living.......and I was wondering what recommendations those of you may have who already do this for a living or have taken some instruction in any of the above fields would have.

what types of classes to take?
What are the best schools?
Whats the job like on a daily basis?
Do you enjoy what you do?
or any other info or advice you might have for a beginning fabricator looking to get further knowledge and skills, such as other websites, books, anything.

Thanks guys.
We have danced around this question several times.
Knowing what I know at this point in time.
I would start out with basic Business Classes and Math and English, maybe some Spanish. I would do that while I was working in a fab shop preferable, but it could be a exhaust shop or a machine shop.
There goes a year or two. You now have a grasp on how to run a buisness and you can do basic math and your writing skills are more good'r.
Then I would take every welding course available at your local Community Collage. Unless you happen to have a wallet full of money and one of the cool skewels in your town. that is in the morning in the afternoon take more math and start taking the various courses in CAD, you are aiming for being good at solid modeling, you can work nights and having any kind of social life is way over rated!! and that is what Sundays are for... there goes another 2 years...
At this point if you did it right you could have three associates degrees, one in buisness and one in CAD, and one in welding.
Those math and engrish classes I mentioned first... they are required fair for the typical degrees... 4 years 3 degrees... Now that you have is a scholastic value out side of the shop that will pay you dividends for the rest of your life, and you can Weld as good'nuf as anyone. You can if you want go to the cool skewels like like WOT TFS, Etc... or you have enough value that you can walk in to most any shop and have a good chance of getting hired because you learned the chit that most welders don't!
And that is my opinion, and I wish I had done it that way, but I didn't I did it the hard way.
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Last edited by entropy; 10-31-2009 at 07:55 PM. Reason: s-d
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  #3  
Old 10-31-2009, 04:49 PM
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wyoming9 wyoming9 is offline
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Red face

I could not agree more .

what is it like . ???

I get real satisfaction from a job well done. I also find making a whole pile of money is less important to me then enjoying what I am doing .

There are also times when it becomes just another job . These periods of time are very short. If they become too long it is time to look at something else. Well to my way of thinking anyway.

Good luck
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Some days it takes longer to pick which welder

then to do the welding
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Old 01-04-2010, 04:19 AM
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crawlin91 crawlin91 is offline
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thanks for the responses. I did some research and now am working towards a MET degree, they have alot of metal fab classes at the school too. and doing as much reading as I can on sites like this, and learning to fab/wrench on my own rigs.

Ill look into some related jobs but I feel with no "real experience" that may be hard in tough economic times.
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Old 01-04-2010, 04:39 AM
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wyoming9 wyoming9 is offline
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Red face

If you have a good attitude . Not the i know everything Some how you will pay your dues it always seems to happen . With me it was floors in garbage trucks

It is not all that hard to get an entry level job. Don`t call off for a paper cut or your aunts cat being buried and you will be good to go.

I was lucky as I had several mentors that I learned so very much from.

Also you do know that finding a job in the off road fabbing industry at the best of times can be real hard. Some people can be real happy making a hobby into a job others will say it was the worse thing they ever did.

Learn all you can
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Some days it takes longer to pick which welder

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Old 01-04-2010, 05:42 AM
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crawlin91 crawlin91 is offline
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I figure you pay your dues, get the education, prove yourself through quality work and it will eventually happen. You only live once gotta do what you love, right?

This stuff is all I can think about, glad I found this site so much good info and projects to drool over. Thanks again.
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  #7  
Old 02-02-2011, 06:17 PM
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TheFabSchool TheFabSchool is offline
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Not sure where you're located but you should check out our fabrication school, The Fab School. We are located in Riverside CA and offer 6 month to year and a half long fabrication courses, depending on what your needs and goals are.

The curriculum covers everything from Mig & Tig welding, tube bending, tube nothching, tube cutting, pattern design, chassis design, suspension design, aluminum and sheet metal work as well as drafting. And all this is just in the introduction course. Upon succesful completion of the 6 month course there is job placement assistance offered.

We pride ourselves on being an accredited school with small class sizes, which guarantees you quality instuction. We have flexible schedules and try to fit ever persons needs. If the sixth month course is not doable for you, we also have weekend classes available. Our doors are always open to anyone wanting to see firsthand what we have to offer. Feel free to give me a call or stop in if I can be of any help.

Shannon (951) 782-0567
www.thefabschool.com
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Old 09-03-2011, 07:16 PM
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disrespected_fab disrespected_fab is offline
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Wyoming9-new to the forum: 1st post. I was lurking and saw that you are from New Tripoli. I'll be 30 in October and have grown up in the lehigh valley. I recently bought property 2mi from ez-pull in new ringgold. Howdy neighbor!
Anyway, I was wondering what business you own or what exactly you do? I too have been thinkin of changing careers and have really been interested in learning welding.
I am almost done w/my garage and will finally have a place to do projects away from work. Yay! I have been a GM tech and have gone thru HS and college for training.
Sorry for making this long. Do you know where to go around here to learn metal fabrication(shaping metal and welding) and chassis building? I'm really interested in making my own items and more classic truck/car building. Closest I can find is Wyotech but they are so far away and don't know how to do that w/out quiting my job for 1.5yrs.
I used to not have the patience for bodywork, but making things has always been fun to. Or taking them apart as my other half says...
1st up is my 1950 Chevy 3100 =)
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  #9  
Old 09-03-2011, 07:22 PM
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disrespected_fab disrespected_fab is offline
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Sorry, double post

Last edited by disrespected_fab; 09-03-2011 at 07:49 PM.
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  #10  
Old 09-05-2011, 04:28 PM
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FabChild FabChild is offline
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wow I read entropy's post and it was scary lol That's pretty much what i'm going through at the moment. I decided to change careers 2 years ago and I wanted to get into Welding and Fabrication. I live in San Bernardino and am very close to "The Fab School." However I didn't have the money to attend a technical school and decided on a formal education. I enrolled in Riverside Community College and started taking welding classes my first semester. I placed into college English but bombed my math and had to start off taking arithmetic and pre-algebra. This was a good thing because it got me caught back up on my basic math skills. I did so well my first 2 semesters that I got a job in the Welding department as a Lab-Aid and eventually a student instructor for the basic Tig Welding class. Now I have finished all my welding, math, English and science classes. Since the college dosen't offer classes on fabrication I knew that portion I would have to learn on my own. So to help I decided to take on another degree. Engineering Software from Norco college. I have to learn drafting, autocad, solidworks, and Inventor along with other computer classes. I just started those classes this semester and am taking some more general ed but my goal is to graduate with both degrees next June. I love what I am doing and have been fortunate enough to be able to attend full-time. I have completed 61 units and my GPA is 3.8. I hope to graduate with honors. I think community college is a great way to get an education and is a much better route than an expensive technical school. My brother graduated from Universal Technical Institute and spent over 20,000 for less than 2 years of school. I wasn't a bad education just NOT worth the price.
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  #11  
Old 09-14-2011, 12:06 AM
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Campbell45 Campbell45 is offline
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I went to wyotech in blairsville, pa. The chassis fab course has so much information its almost hard to grasp it all. Its a very good school but the living experience, town, things to do, is just awful. Its expensive but if you do all your work and go beyond what is asked of you I believe you get your moneys worth and then some. I'm not sure if your familiar with the school but I believe it gets a bad rep from the people who are lazy, like to complain, or fail out.
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