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  #21  
Old 12-09-2012, 03:23 PM
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METAL TWISTER METAL TWISTER is offline
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Thanks for the added info. I am very cautious buying HF stuff with moving parts, but it sounds like you like yours. Are those 1/4-20s you use steel or aluminum? Where do you buy them?
X2 on the HF tools its always a Crap Shoot as to how long they will last. Just depends on how much you are going to use them? I don't do any production work with them but I use them fairly often. I use both steel and aluminum nutserts but mostly aluminum. I buy my nutserts locally at a place called Ababa bolt. I looked into buying large quantities a while back and found these guys...

http://www.hansonrivet.com/index.php4

I'm just saying for under 20 bucks buy the HF model and if ya like it, great. If it gets you through a quick job great, throw them in the box and buy an expensive set up and use the hf for back up... ? About all I have for ya. good luck and let us know what you end up doing.
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  #22  
Old 12-25-2012, 05:54 PM
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TheBandit TheBandit is offline
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Thanks again to everyone for your help and suggestions for my rookie questions. I ended up with the Marson tool. I had told my wife about it before looking into the HF one and the in-laws bought it for me for Christmas. It came with an assortment of ribbed steel nuts. The unit is heavy and seems to be built well. I gave it a shot this morning. It seemed to do the job. The only thing I'm not too sure about is how hard to set the nut. I could feel when the nut stopped deforming and gave it a bit of extra pressure, but I don't know if that was enough or too much. Any words of caution or advice on how much to squeeze?
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Last edited by TheBandit; 12-26-2012 at 12:33 PM.
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  #23  
Old 12-26-2012, 08:11 AM
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FrogDog FrogDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
. Any words of caution our advice on how much to squeeze?
Pretty much a stupid answer to a stupid ? ... hehe....

Unless your tool has quality, mechanical stop gauged for the arbor, nutcert, thread size and medium.. you'll never know.. So.. unless your very weak, you shouldn't screw up a hand squezzer of that size.... .. with that said, I myself always gives that extra pull as you did....


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  #24  
Old 12-26-2012, 04:23 PM
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METAL TWISTER METAL TWISTER is offline
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X2 go ahead and squeeze tight... Only problems Ive ever had is pulling the threads out of the smaller aluminum inserts. You can always reload a previously installed sert and put more squeeze to it if its loose.
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  #25  
Old 12-26-2012, 05:14 PM
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Captainfab Captainfab is offline
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I would say the answer to how much to set the rivnuts, depends on how tight the hole was, what the bolt size is and what material the rivnut is? I've installed about 2000 4mm steel rivnuts this year. I did snap off one mandrel before I backed off a little on how much crush I was giving them.
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  #26  
Old 01-02-2013, 06:01 PM
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TheBandit TheBandit is offline
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Here's the gun I got. So far so good. I've done 4 steel 1/4-20 rivet nuts so far. They are a little tough to get started (I have somewhat weak hands due to nerve damage), but once they start crushing down it's not hard at all. The tool is heavy and seems very well built. The case is even decent.



Here is what one of my installed rivet nuts looks like from the backside.



I need some schooling on drilling sheet metal holes. I end up with some "shrapnel" / tearout on the back side of my holes. That can't be good for the rivet nut. Any tips on reducing or eliminating that? Perhaps I need to add more steps in the drilling process. I've been doing pilot-finish. I probably should be doing pilot, larger, larger larger, larger, finish or get a step drill.
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Last edited by TheBandit; 01-02-2013 at 06:05 PM.
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  #27  
Old 01-02-2013, 06:10 PM
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Defender Chassis Defender Chassis is offline
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Step drills are definitely the way to go on sheet metal.
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