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UTV/Buggy Fabrication For all those doing your own fabrication on the Yamaha Rhino and other UTV's


UTV/Buggy Fabrication For all those doing your own fabrication on the Yamaha Rhino and other UTV's

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  #1  
Old 10-02-2015, 08:18 AM
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Chenowth build/resto project

I picked up an old chenowth last year with the idea that I'd put a little time and money into it to clean it up and flip it for some cash. Then I let it get into my head and started to like it too much so flipping it is out the window and I want to keep it and make it bad ass!

Here is what I started with. As you can tell it needs a lot of work. The previous owner had some ideas to make it street legal and was trying to frame a windshield, but it just looked completely hack.









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Old 10-02-2015, 08:28 AM
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Unfortunately the owner was diagnosed with cancer and the rail project was abandoned. He passed and his son's had no interest in finishing the project. I have no idea how long it sat so I got the engine running with a new coil and then decided to completely tear the rail down.

I spent about 12 hours with a wire wheel and an angle grinder and cleaned it up for paint. Rattle can red!


This rail is not built for a 6'2" frame and bolting the seats to the floor pan was not an option because it sat me straight up and put my head into the roof bars.


I needed the seat to lean back and drop down a little like this.


So in true overboard fashion I decided to fabricate safer seat mounts that would ti into the chassis for a safer ride and accomplish the position I needed to be comfortable.


Ground clearance would need to be somewhat compromised, but the goal was to minimize the loss to less than 1.5".
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Old 10-02-2015, 08:34 AM
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The tie in needed to be strong. I've already rolled my mini rail and I want my seat to stay put in the event of roll over.

The width of the cradle couldn't have been a better fit without modifying the chassis.


The clearance loss from the center bars on the chassis floor is 1.25".




Sizing up the bends and measuring for cross bar.






Just where I need them!
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  #4  
Old 10-02-2015, 08:45 AM
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Shifter linkage has plenty of clearance. I also wanted some upright(ish) supports to strengthen agains bottom outs.



Looking strong!


Next on the agenda was to cut the seat pans to size and drill the mounting holes.







As you can see from these shots, the clearance loss is minimal.



Hard to see the gussets to the center bars from the crossbar, but this thing is solid! I like the way it turned out. My goal was to make it strong without looking hack. It needed to add to the strength of the rail and blend well with the design of the chassis instead of looking like an add on. How did I do?





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Old 10-02-2015, 09:42 AM
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The plan is to run it stock for the time being, but eventually I want to go to 3x3 trailing arms and either fabricate a new wide front beam with longer trailing arms and coil overs, buy a new front beam, or convert it to long travel a-arms.
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  #6  
Old 10-02-2015, 11:18 AM
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Nice work! I wasn't too sure about dropping the seats below the bottom of the existing frame as I was reading it, but that execution looks really good. What gauge are your seat pans? They look pretty beefy.

If I lived closer to the dunes up in Michigan, I would probably own one of these. They look like pretty cheap fun!
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Old 10-02-2015, 11:29 AM
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Love the old school sand cars.. nice job...
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  #8  
Old 10-02-2015, 11:34 AM
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That is exactly the way I reworked a Funco about 15 years ago for a 6'5" friend.
Be sure to make the front edge of the seat pan so that it is not a Sand Scoop.

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Old 10-02-2015, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by entropy View Post
Be sure to make the front edge of the seat pan so that it is not a Sand Scoop.
May I suggest a full length skid? There's nothing worse than having a branch skewer you from under the car or a rock fly into your crotch. Been there done that.

Excellent work
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Old 10-02-2015, 12:18 PM
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Thanks guys! I'm pretty happy with it. It will have a floor pan. The seat skids are 1/8" with the leading edge welded to frame to stop from scooping. I may reinforce trailing edge. My ass is pretty well protected. Working on battery box behind passenger seat now.
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  #11  
Old 10-02-2015, 07:30 PM
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A little progress today. I considered buying a pre-fabbed battery mount box, but I didn't want to spend the money on something no one would ever see anyway. This took much longer than I thought! Fitting angle iron against tubing is harder than tubing against tubing. Grind a little... almost. Grind a little more... too much!



I broke out the 3/8"-24 tap and threaded the angle beneath the tie down. This will make it much easier than dicking with nuts (bwahahaha!)


Also broke out the cheap ass 30" bending brake and made the tie down. I love that tool, even though I rarely get to use it.


Plenty of clearance in the rear.


Probably a little overkill with 3/16". Really wish I would have used 1/8", but oh well this will be here after the apocalypse. I added some expanded metal to the tray as well. Just need to paint it and it's finished. On to the next thing.

Last edited by Gotlift; 10-03-2015 at 12:52 AM.
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  #12  
Old 11-12-2015, 09:48 PM
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Got a little done today. Seems like every time I set out to do something small it turns into a side project. I didn't like any of my options for mounting my cutting brake. I didn't want to straddle the shift rod since that would put it too high. There wasn't enough room beside the shift rod without putting it too close to either seat. I don't even know how the PO could reach it where he had it mounted in front of the shifter before. So I decided to fab a mount and put it where I needed it.


First the bend.


Then figuring out best place to mount it.


This is optimal with plenty of clearance for the shifter and the throw on the brake.


I think it turned out pretty good and it doesn't interfere with my right leg on the gas pedal.

The shifter is in 1st gear in this pic.








I had to move the shifter back about 1.75" to make it comfortable so I shortened the rod. It feels sloppy because the little plastic fitting is missing in the shift rod hole. I'm going to make sure that fixes the shifter before I mount anything permanently. Then I'll probably tack it in and try it out before fully welding it in. I've also read bad reviews on this shifter so I will probably run it tacked for a while until I decide I don't need to buy a different shifter and it needs to move to make room for a taller handle.
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  #13  
Old 11-13-2015, 01:32 PM
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Nice
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  #14  
Old 12-17-2015, 03:21 AM
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nice. we can all see the progress you've done. great job. planning to buy a new shifter, right? where do you usually browse products?
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  #15  
Old 12-18-2015, 04:37 PM
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nice. we can all see the progress you've done. great job. planning to buy a new shifter, right? where do you usually browse products?
Thanks! Its been fun. The T-handle is the new shifter. It had the original beetle shifter when I picked it up. I usually shop amazon first for parts, just because I have a rewards card and a lot of companies have a presence on amazon now. Otherwise I'll look on Pacific Customs' site.

I just picked up 4 Hella series 500 lights on amazon and ordered a 1" die for my JD2 Model 3 bender on eBay. I want to fab a baja style light bar to mount to the A-pillar. This thing may never run again if I don't stop thinking of things to do to it instead of just finishing it, but its gonna look cool and be a lot of fun in the process. Too cold to ride right now anyway!
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  #16  
Old 01-02-2016, 08:15 PM
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I decided to add some bling and built a Baja style light rack. I just need to finish it up and build my support rods and tie them in. It was a fun project. What do you think?




I know, the weld on the end looks terrible. I made a miscut when I notched it and had to fill in a spot. Notching with more than one tube intersecting is pain and I'm still not very good at it. I gound it down and I usually don't grind my welds.











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  #17  
Old 01-03-2016, 12:29 PM
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Like it
Now add the support from the top tube back to the cage cross tube but use rod ends and tabs and put a linear actuator in betwixt the SRE's so that you can aim the lights on the fly....


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  #18  
Old 01-03-2016, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by entropy View Post
Like it
Now add the support from the top tube back to the cage cross tube but use rod ends and tabs and put a linear actuator in betwixt the SRE's so that you can aim the lights on the fly....


E
That's a cool idea! Maybe later. I'm just going to make some manual tie rods for now.

I just need to finish it instead of blowing money on cool ideas!

... but because you mentioned it. What kind of actuator would you use?
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2016, 01:58 PM
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What ever I can find that fits.
You don't need much usually maybe a couple inches.
I always start looking here:

E
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2016, 02:13 PM
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nice light bar man...
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