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Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.


Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.

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  #141  
Old 09-30-2014, 07:52 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TS3g View Post
Just two weeks ago I finally had the luxury of joining the rollover club after 7 years of driving. The 15 car in the pic spun down the track and hooked my RR as I was went by, my car turned to the right, tripped over the LR, and over I went two times. Luckily the only thing hurt was the car (which is my dad's, whoops) and my ego.

And man do I need to go to Eldora some day!
Ouch! Glad to hear you're OK.

Everyone that likes dirt racing should get to Eldora at least once. I really like the Four Crown...it's the only event where all three USAC divisions are in action. Since I started helping a buddy run a non-wing car, I much prefer that type of racing. It doesn't have the sheer speed, but it's much more competitive than running the wings.
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  #142  
Old 09-30-2014, 12:07 PM
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chloeedad chloeedad is offline
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Those 1/4" thick aluminum washers look cool as hell. I wonder how functional they are compared to a similarly sized steel fender washer. Did you make them yourself or find them some place?
Those are sold. We ran them on the late model this year for the sides. They did a wonderful job before they ripped a huge hole in the sheet metal when we got tied up in a wreck.
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  #143  
Old 09-30-2014, 01:02 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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A&A Manufacturing is one source: http://www.aa-mfg.com/aluminum-washer-792
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  #144  
Old 10-03-2014, 01:47 AM
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OutlawFred OutlawFred is offline
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well im new here, and fascinated by this build!! I race outlaw late models in Michigan and go to school at unoh. Ive got so many questions! to start, whats the advantage for running cantilever coil-overs in the front? is there any really besides aero?
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  #145  
Old 10-03-2014, 08:05 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Originally Posted by OutlawFred View Post
well im new here, and fascinated by this build!! I race outlaw late models in Michigan and go to school at unoh. Ive got so many questions! to start, whats the advantage for running cantilever coil-overs in the front? is there any really besides aero?
Welcome! Where do you race in Michigan? I'm planning on running this car at Spartan next season. I used to live up there so I went to Auto City, Dixie, and Owosso pretty regularly.

The reason for the cantilevers was really about packaging the rack & pinion steering. In order to fit everything where I wanted it, the cantilevers seemed to be the best approach at the time. They do allow for a bit wider spring base and I have a slight rising rate built into the front suspension, which is something you can't easily do with outboard shocks on a solid axle.

If I had it to do all over again, I don't know if I would do the cantilevers. After I had started building this car, I built a supermodified that had a front steer rack and outboard coils behind the axle. The compromise there is the radius rods have to be moved inboard to clear the shocks. That car worked well and was simpler than this one.
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  #146  
Old 10-04-2014, 12:14 PM
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OutlawFred OutlawFred is offline
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I've run all of those tracks but mainly I've been running Owosso, Dixie is essentially shut down, and all anyone does at auto city is fight, which I don't want any part of, but that's a whole different discussion. I'm looking at running a super next year so who knows where ill be running.
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  #147  
Old 10-07-2014, 04:53 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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I've been working on the brake pedal assembly for the past few nights. Finally have something worth showing!

This is a bit different because I'm setting the pedal up to move up and down rather than fore and aft. It makes a big difference in driver comfort when you're over 6' tall...the up/down movement takes up less room in the cockpit, and you can just plant your heel and pivot your ankle, which just makes the car easier to drive.

In order to pull this off, I'm putting the master cylinders under the seat, so the whole assembly is a one-off. This is what I came up with, minus the pedal:



The pedal box is made out of 3/8" and 3/4" aluminum flat stock, with the pieces bolted and doweled together. I figured this was the best bet to locate everything accurately and make sure the pedal won't bind later. The pedal will eventually ride in the bushings near the top of the assembly.

Another couple photos:





The master cylinders came from Howe Racing Enterprises in Michigan. They're a unique design that does a lot to reduce seal wear because they don't have a cup seal riding over the compensation port that allows fluid to come from the reservoir. They're also really small compared to standard Tilton pieces, and allow the system to self-bleed if the reservoir is above the calipers.

The bias bar is from Tilton Engineering. The steel sleeve in the center eventually gets welded into the pedal (which will be made out of 4130 sheet).

The assembly is a little heavier than I would like. I may eventually tear it apart and machine some material out to save some weight. But, if I'm going to have any extra weight, it would be the best possible location (as low and left as it could possibly be in the car). My main goal for the brake system is to make everything as rigid as possible, and I think I've accomplished that here.

The plan is for a 6:1 pedal ratio. Next up is actually fabricating the pedal.
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  #148  
Old 10-08-2014, 02:25 AM
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baxter baxter is offline
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Awesome car!You have mad skills.Do you build many dirt cars?Eldora is only about 20-25 min from me.My mother-n-law cut Tony Stewarts hair for a while.

Last edited by baxter; 10-08-2014 at 03:07 AM.
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  #149  
Old 10-08-2014, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by baxter View Post
Awesome car!You have mad skills.Do you build many dirt cars?Eldora is only about 20-25 min from me.My mother-n-law cut Tony Stewarts hair for a while.
Thanks! I don't actually build many of anything, this is a hobby for me...I have a full time job and a family so shop time can be limited. I help a good buddy of mine with a dirt car. This past winter I did a fairly major chassis mod and some tinwork, in addition to a couple other pieces and parts. Here is a picture of that in process:



And a couple of the car at its first outing at Waynesfield:





We're planning on going to Eldora Saturday for the Sprintacular. Should be a good show!
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  #150  
Old 10-20-2014, 03:55 PM
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I finished up my brake pedal over the weekend. Here is a pic of the pedal assembly:



The pedal itself is 0.090" thick 4130 sheet. The pad that your foot rests on is a piece of 2" streamline. The stuff has just the right shape to comfortably rest the ball of your foot on.

Another view:



The pedal is a 1" wide section, tapering from 2" tall at the pivot down to 1" at the end. The pedal ratio is 6:1, which I'm hoping is a good compromise between reasonable pedal effort and not having excessive travel.

I plan on making the gas pedal this week. After that, I need to get the driver in here to test fit everything.
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  #151  
Old 10-20-2014, 04:25 PM
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TheBandit TheBandit is offline
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Is there any way to make the pedal ratio adjustable?
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  #152  
Old 10-20-2014, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Is there any way to make the pedal ratio adjustable?
Not easily on this one. Some of the nicer Tilton and Wilwood pedals have multiple bolt patterns drilled into the pedal pad that allow moving it to adjust the ratio. With this deal, the pedal is so long, you would have to move the pad quite a bit to do that.

I think if there is an issue I will probably adjust the overall system ratio by swapping out master cylinders. These are 7/8". Howe makes them in 1/16" increments from 3/4" to 1", and Tilton makes them in a slightly different style from 5/8" up to 1-1/8".
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  #153  
Old 11-11-2014, 09:21 AM
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Nothing too exciting to report. Both my wife and I have had hellish work schedules for the past couple months, so it leaves little time in the shop.

I did manage to make a gas pedal. This is 1/2" x 0.058" wall tubing, with a small piece of streamline for the pedal pad. There is a heavy duty momentary switch (Moroso sells them as a starter switch) built into the gas pedal to serve as a kill switch in case the throttle would stick down.



I also got the pedals mounted in the car over the weekend. The brake pedal is on a boxed bracket made out of 4130 sheet. It's just tacked in for now until Mark has a chance to try out the placement.



Here's the gas pedal, the pivot was turned out of a piece of 3/4" 1018 stock, and the rest of the mount is 0.063" 4130 sheet. I got a box with some hardware from McMaster-Carr yesterday to finish bolting it in. I'll take a pic of what I'm doing in a little more detail tonight, it's a clever trick I stole from Tom Lipton.



I've started mounting the fuel tank. More pics of that soon.
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  #154  
Old 11-11-2014, 11:45 AM
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How does that kill switch work? I assume it doesn't just kill the motor when you are at WOT.
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  #155  
Old 11-11-2014, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
How does that kill switch work? I assume it doesn't just kill the motor when you are at WOT.
No. If the throttle sticks down, your first instinct is to pull up with your foot on the toe loop, where the switch is attached. This will cause you to push up on the button with the top of your foot. The switch grounds the mag, shutting the engine off.

In normal operation, it should never get hit. If it does, the engine will refire once you stop pushing the button (if the car is still rolling). Most sprint car gas pedals have the loop, but no switch. A couple of sanctioning bodies have added this to their rules after some nasty crashes that started with a stuck throttle.
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  #156  
Old 11-11-2014, 12:34 PM
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I could have used one of those a few years ago in a rotary-powered sandrail. The throttle stuck as we were heading toward the sky on a jump. We ended up catching way more air than intended, slammed down and bent the front wheels and steering linkage before popping back onto a wheelie for some distance before we managed to shut it down. It was a friend's rail and he installed the switches upside down and without labels, so the whole time this was going on we were struggling to shut the engine off. Fortunately nobody was hurt - could have been much worse.
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  #157  
Old 11-11-2014, 01:11 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
I could have used one of those a few years ago in a rotary-powered sandrail...
Sounds ugly. At least you had some room to get it shut off. The bad part about circle track racing is a stuck throttle usually results in contact with an immovable object.
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  #158  
Old 11-24-2014, 11:29 AM
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Not too much exciting stuff to report. Here are a couple detail pictures of the throttle pedal mounting. I used a trick from Tom Lipton to simplify this. In order to make sure everything swings freely, I made a small shaft that has a shoulder on one side, and is about 0.015" longer than the distance across the bushings on the gas pedal. Rather than trying to thread a short standoff at the end to allow the pedal to get secured with a nut, Tom's trick is to drill and tap the shaft, then use a long set screw to get the threads I needed. Here's the short shaft, with the screw installed:



And with the pedal installed:



Eventually the set screw will get secured to the car with red loctite, and a Nylok nut will be used. I was going to drill the set screw for a cotter pin and use a castle nut, but I learned that set screws are harder than I thought when I tried to drill one.

I've also been working on getting the fuel tank mounted to the car. I decide the simplest, lightest solution would be to machine some mounts out of aluminum that bolt to the tank. The tank itself on most sprint cars is plastic, and a bladder is placed inside of it that actually holds the fuel.

Here's a pic of one of the mounts in process:



And the finished piece:



Here is the pair of lower mounts Cleco'd to the tank:



They're secured to the tank by an inner plate that has six 10-32 button head screws tacked to it. The plate will get taped over on the inside before the bladder is installed to the screw heads and plate don't chafe the bladder. I had to put a second access hole in the tank after this picture was taken, which will later be covered by a plate. My arms would have to be five feet long with three elbows to reach the inner plates without it!

I'm working on getting the tank actually bolted to the car now...
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  #159  
Old 11-24-2014, 11:47 AM
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MeanMike MeanMike is offline
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You have a great level of detail in this car. Is this typical for pavement sprint cars? I would imagine not, but I've never looked at any sprint cars up close.

FYI, Gambler Sprint cars is/used to be in the town I live in. I haven't been by their shop in a long time, it may be closed now. KC Spurlocks Semi for the top fuel car used to sit outside their shop. Bailey Chassis, who I believe broke off from Gambler is also here in Hendersonville. I tried for years to get a job at Gambler.
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  #160  
Old 11-24-2014, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by MeanMike View Post
You have a great level of detail in this car. Is this typical for pavement sprint cars? I would imagine not, but I've never looked at any sprint cars up close.

FYI, Gambler Sprint cars is/used to be in the town I live in. I haven't been by their shop in a long time, it may be closed now. KC Spurlocks Semi for the top fuel car used to sit outside their shop. Bailey Chassis, who I believe broke off from Gambler is also here in Hendersonville. I tried for years to get a job at Gambler.
Thanks! Yes and no on the level of detail. In some respects it is typical if you are buying a car from Beast, but the cars are somewhat mass produced and many of the pieces are CNC'd in a particular configuration. In other respects it's not typical because the parts are designed to be mass produced...so some of the adjustments, stuff in double shear, and custom parts I've made wouldn't be found on a purchased car due to the sheer expense of doing things this way. If I had to make money selling this car it would be one expensive piece due to the time involved.

I'm pretty sure Gambler is completely out of business now, but many of the critical dimensions on modern day dirt cars are similar, if not the same as, the cars that Gambler was turning out in the mid-80's. They were one of the pioneers of the truly mass produced sprint car. Others built a fair amount of cars, but not to the level that Gambler did. I think Bailey is still active building mini-Sprints, but I haven't seen any full sprints from them. I think Maxim is now the largest American sprint car builder, but J&J, DRC, Spike, Eagle, and Ti-22 all do a fair number of cars.
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