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Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.


Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.

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  #241  
Old 08-05-2015, 10:13 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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More progress to report! I'm getting the cockpit area finished out.

First up was the cable adjuster for the brake bias bar. Nothing real trick here, just a tab for the knob, and some Adel clamps to route the cable neatly. One thing Tilton does right is they give you good instructions on how to install one of these, including a drawing showing the placement of the required holes. This saves time reverse engineering so you can bolt something down.



Next up was the firewall. This took more time than I thought it should. All the little notches took a bunch of time to measure up and cut...then I wound up having to trim the whole panel down to be able to install it. I have a couple more holes to put in it for the gauge lines, then I may end up bead rolling a little pattern in it.



The tach is down on the lower right side because it's basically unreadable when the car is running. The biggest thing it does for us is returns peak RPM for the session to help get gearing right.

The last thing for this update is a small gauge cluster that mounts to the steering column support. I started out making a sheet metal box that was attached to the firewall, but found it didn't fit inside the steering column support when it stuck out far enough to have room for the gauges. So I decided to make it out of thicker material as a flat plate. This is 3/16" 6061 flat stock.

Layout done, clamped in the vise to put the big holes in:



After roughing out with the band saw:



The vertical band saw is one of my favorite tools in the shop. I don't know how I got along for so long without one.

I cleaned it up with a sanding drum and flap drum in my die grinder, followed by a little emery cloth around the edges. Here's the result, with gauges installed. Only vital information is needed!



The extra bump on the left side is for the mag switch. I haven't drilled the hole yet because I need to pick one up.

Installed on the steering support:

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  #242  
Old 08-05-2015, 03:43 PM
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TheBandit TheBandit is offline
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What method/cutting tool did you use to cut the big holes?
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  #243  
Old 08-05-2015, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
What method/cutting tool did you use to cut the big holes?
Roughed out with a 2-1/2" hole saw and tuned up with a boring head. Using a 2-5/8" hole saw directly makes the holes a little too oversize for my liking.
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  #244  
Old 08-05-2015, 05:09 PM
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For the curvy outside shape, were you able to cut that in one continuous motion with your bandsaw? I have a cheap HF portaband that I've mounted vertically. I've cut some steel with it, but mostly straight cuts and I don't think I could cut those radii without the blade binding or wanting to go straight.
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  #245  
Old 08-05-2015, 05:25 PM
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Love the old school dykem look!

Most don't know how well you can scroll with a bandsaw. I have an 1/8" blade on an old Delta Rockwell that rips through patterns like that.

Love your work!
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  #246  
Old 08-05-2015, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
For the curvy outside shape, were you able to cut that in one continuous motion with your bandsaw? I have a cheap HF portaband that I've mounted vertically. I've cut some steel with it, but mostly straight cuts and I don't think I could cut those radii without the blade binding or wanting to go straight.
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Love the old school dykem look!

Most don't know how well you can scroll with a bandsaw. I have an 1/8" blade on an old Delta Rockwell that rips through patterns like that.

Love your work!
Yeah, that's pretty much it, use a narrow blade for tighter radii. In this case, I was using a 1/4" wide blade, not exactly sure what TPI, because it's one that came with my saw. The top was done in one pass, but the bottom was laid out close to the edge so it came out in shorter pieces.

You could probably have narrow blades made up for a portaband, but I'm not sure how well they would track on the wheels.

Dykem is great stuff, isn't it!
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  #247  
Old 08-05-2015, 08:10 PM
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Rokcrler Rokcrler is offline
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Simply badass
Clean, bling, awesome thought and execution!
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  #248  
Old 08-07-2015, 05:05 PM
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Thanks for the tips. I'll see if a narrower blade will work on mine. I didn't mention it above, but I really like how the gauge panel turned out. In fact the whole steering "column" strut support system is just cool to look at.
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  #249  
Old 08-07-2015, 05:25 PM
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Thanks for the tips. I'll see if a narrower blade will work on mine. I didn't mention it above, but I really like how the gauge panel turned out. In fact the whole steering "column" strut support system is just cool to look at.
I agree also. I like the pull for the quick release too, I have that same wheel but the pin style quick release...it sucks!
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  #250  
Old 08-07-2015, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rokcrler View Post
Simply badass
Clean, bling, awesome thought and execution!
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Thanks for the tips. I'll see if a narrower blade will work on mine. I didn't mention it above, but I really like how the gauge panel turned out. In fact the whole steering "column" strut support system is just cool to look at.
Thanks! It would be interesting to see if a narrow blade would track right on a portaband. If it works, next you will want a bigger throat ASAP. I have a 16" saw and I would gladly take a 24"!

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Originally Posted by bullnerd View Post
I agree also. I like the pull for the quick release too, I have that same wheel but the pin style quick release...it sucks!
Thanks! I don't think we're allowed to run a pin style quick release per the rules, because they suck! This is a Woodward piece with an oversized pull ring, which I think is a great idea because you have to operate it wearing gloves.
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  #251  
Old 08-08-2015, 05:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
Roughed out with a 2-1/2" hole saw and tuned up with a boring head. Using a 2-5/8" hole saw directly makes the holes a little too oversize for my liking.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/DrillHog-2-9...item2804b156d7

If the link doesn't work, they have Bi-metal 2-9/16" hole saws on ebay, if interested.
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  #252  
Old 08-10-2015, 02:11 PM
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This weekend's main project was getting my air filter situation sorted out. Originally, I had everything set up to run standard K&N sprint car filters, which slide onto each pair of stacks. Simple, clean, and they just plain work. I made the steering shaft support such that it just went under the edge of the filter. Everything was good...until our engine builder found he could flatten out the power curve without affecting the peak by cutting 2" off the velocity stacks.

Now I had clearance problems between the steering shaft, its support, and the air filters...which meant coming up with Plan B.

I searched on the K&N site and found a large panel type filter that was actually the spec part for the Indy Racing League, and the price was right (about $75). With filter in hand, I did a number of sketches trying to come up with a simple solution to connecting it to my injection. After settling on a design, I fiddled around with some test strips to get be exact bend placement and sequence right, then went to the shear and the brake to get this:



I managed to make the whole thing out of one large piece, which saved a bunch of welding. This is my initial mockup before welding the corners.

After tacking, I checked the placement of the tunnel for the steering shaft. I cut this before bending, which required some planning, but made cutting the opening a bunch easier.



My aluminum welding continues to improve! Need to work on consistency, but it's much better than it used to be.



I added flanges to the tops of the stacks to have something to attach to. There's a 10-32 nut plate on each flange to screw the box down.



After adding the tunnel, poking the holes for the stacks, and getting the screw holes in place:



There's a small filler piece in each corner to make up a gap caused by the corners of the filter element having a large radius. I will say that nothing makes you measure an extra two or three times like taking a large hole saw to a piece that you already have most of a day invested in!

Overall view from the RF corner:



I still have to make and attach the stainless clips that will secure the filter element to the air box, then body work begins in earnest. The body is my favorite part of building one of these because it means you're almost DONE!

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  #253  
Old 08-10-2015, 05:25 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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The air box looks great. I assume that you'll add some sort of gasket between the box and the stacks?

As for the aluminum welding, cleanliness and timing is everything. Work on making your torch travel and filler addition more regular. I know this is easier said then done but it is the key to aluminum welding, more so then heat or travel speed. The puddle freezes every time you dip so if you're dipping inconsistently you end up with varying steps in the stack o' dimes. And secondly, I don't think you are prepping the area to weld enough. Use a SS brush and scrub until you can feel the brush really dragging on the aluminum. Scrub each joint right before you weld it. It only takes a few minutes for the aluminum to start building an oxide layer and if you prescrub all the joints and then start welding the last few joints will have enough oxide to make welding harder. Also use a scotch brite pad on your filler rod right before you weld, again scrubbing until you feel the pad start to drag a lot. The oxide in the filler rod will make the filler not want to join with the puddle.

Hope that helps,
Jaysin
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  #254  
Old 08-10-2015, 06:51 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Thanks for the tips. I did actually wire brush these seams a bit. I generally clean the rod with acetone, but have never scrubbed it. What color Scotchbrite do you use? That may explain some of why I have a tough time getting tacks going on butt and outside corner joints.
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  #255  
Old 08-10-2015, 09:49 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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First, you're welcome, I like to help where I can.

Since you are wire brushing already I will suggest that when you brush like you are currently doing look at the area when you are done and you should easily be able to see that there is a difference between the areas that the oxide has been removed from and those areas that haven't had the oxide removed (I will try to take some pictures for you). It normally takes me 15 to 25 strokes with the wire brush to get all the oxide off the entire length of the joint, you WILL feel the difference when the oxide layer has been removed. You will have dull spots where it's been removed and the rest will be shiny. As for the rod, I use red Scotch Brite and the first few pulls down the rod will feel slick and one or two more pulls will feel like the rod is trying to pull the Scotch Bright out of your fingers,go a few more pulls past this point while turning the rod between strokes to make sure you get all the oxide off. If I use anything to wash the material before welding it is rubbing alcohol, it does the best job for me and it's really cheap.

Jaysin
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  #256  
Old 08-10-2015, 09:58 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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I forgot. When you are tacking, the joint fit up MUST be touching or the puddle will NOT wet across the joint without a lot of added filler. If the joint is tight you should be able to mash the TIG pedal to the floor for less then a second and get a tack with no filler added. (Literally mash it and let off.) This is easier if you have a TIG machine that you can increase the frequency on (100 to 120htz), but it is still fairly easy to do on a transformer machine at 60 htz.

Jaysin
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  #257  
Old 08-10-2015, 11:20 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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Aluminum prep for welding.

First thing worth mentioning is that many of the welder salesmen out there will tell you that the new inverter welders do not require you to clean aluminum before you weld it. I CALL BULLS#!T!! While the new inverter machines will weld said dirty aluminum there isn't one of them that will weld it well or easily.

Here are some photos to show you just what you want to look for when cleaning aluminum before you weld it.

Uncleaned aluminum. Notice that even though it is not polished it is quite reflective, it is the clear oxide layer that makes it shiny. That clear oxide is what we want to remove.


Here is how I see most people clean their aluminum prior to welding. THIS IS NOT NEARLY ENOUGH. Maybe 5 or 6 strokes with the Stainless steel brush. Keep going.


Here we are seeing a spot in the middle that is dull and almost white, this is what we are looking for but we are not done we need the entire joint to look like this.


And here is how the entire joint should look. This is a minimum of 20 strokes or so after you start to feel the brush dragging on the part.


I will guarantee that if you prep like this your aluminum welding will be many times easier and your welds will look better. If you want to take it a bit farther, make sure you clean the edges of the parts that butt together as well. And as I said before, clean your rod too (hehe, that sounds like a personal problem), Scotch Brite is the easiest, just pinch the filler rod in the Scotch Brite and pull the rod through about 8 or 10 times rotating the rod with each pull. Again you will feel the Scotch Brite start to drag a lot on the filler rod as the oxide layer is removed, keep cleaning until the whole rod drags through the Scotch Brite. If it is still slick it ain't clean.

And the whole reason that the oxide layer is problematic is that it's melting point is three times higher then the aluminum beneath it. Aluminum melts at 1221 degrees F and Aluminum Oxide melts at 3762 degrees F. So in order to melt the oxide layer off you have to add so much heat that the aluminum under it starts to over heat and even boil on a microscopic level and that contaminates the weld area. Typically a very oxidized piece of aluminum will have all sorts of black and grey soot along the weld.

I hope this helps you out Graham and I hope anyone who sees this takes it to heart and produces better aluminum welds. Sorry for the thread Hi-Jack. Back to your regularly scheduled sprint car programming.

Jaysin

P.S. I have had students in the TIG class at the Community College where I teach that went from failing the aluminum TIG welding portion of the class to aceing it once they start cleaning like this.
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  #258  
Old 08-11-2015, 09:06 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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All good info, thanks, especially for the photos. I still need to make a rear end breather tank and the body will have some welding in a few places. I will try this out...I need all the help I can get! I'm sure the issues I'm having are mostly me, especially consistency. Plus, welding 0.063" thick material is not the easiest thing. When I weld 0.090" or 1/8", I feel like a superstar...it's that much easier.

I'm running a transformer Lincoln machine right now. It's a Precision TIG 275, so it's at least a square wave machine. I test ran a Miller Dynasty 200 at a show...what a difference on aluminum!

Last edited by Graham08; 08-11-2015 at 09:08 AM.
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  #259  
Old 08-12-2015, 12:42 AM
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ScooteK ScooteK is offline
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Thanks for taking the time Jaysin. I learned something.

Sweet car Graham.
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  #260  
Old 08-12-2015, 08:53 AM
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12husky 12husky is offline
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Wow, I was certainly learned something as well. I need to brush a lot more and I never thought to do the same to the filler. Thanks!
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