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Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.


Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.

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  #121  
Old 07-24-2014, 06:53 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Thanks, guys!

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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
You are living the dream designing and building your own car from scratch. Simply bad ass.

What's on your task list after this is a roller? Beside sitting behind the wheel and going "vroom vroom" while the wife and kids push you around the neighborhood.
Haha. Actually, my buddy Mark will be driving. I may hop in for a hot lap session at some point, but I won't be racing.

The short list after finishing the suspension and getting shock brackets on the frame is something like:

-Brake pedal assembly and master cylinder mounts.
-Brake plumbing
-Throttle pedal and linkage
-Mount fuel cell
-Oil tank
-Radiator
-Fuel, oil, and water plumbing
-Bodywork

And about 100 other little things I'm sure I'm forgetting. Stay tuned, I'll continue to update this thread.
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  #122  
Old 07-25-2014, 12:22 PM
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Finished machining the right birdcage last night. The bearing pressed in without any drama. I was able to put both rear wheels on this thing for the first time in quite a while!



A shot looking from the inside of the car out:



The plan is for the six pin hubs (the piece in the center of the wheel) to disappear and just run splined wheel centers. The hubs are left over from the old car, and were needed for outboard brakes. Going to splined centers saves several pounds vs. separate hubs.

Looking back at the right rear wheel:



There's a bit more space between the right wheel and the frame than there is on the left! It's actually pushed out a little too far in this shot. We're limited by the rules to 43" from the center of the rear end to the outside of the right rear wheel.
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  #123  
Old 07-25-2014, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
I won't be racing.
Why the heck not?
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  #124  
Old 07-25-2014, 12:46 PM
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Several reasons. Mostly because I'm a much better engineer/car builder than I am a driver.
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  #125  
Old 08-06-2014, 07:23 AM
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Just a small update here. I've had a customer project in the shop, so not much progress has been made on the car.

One thing that has bothered me for a while was the wishbones were too flexible. You could squeeze the top and bottom tubes with your hand and feel them move. They were obviously in need of another tube in the middle, so I took care of that with a scrap piece of streamline tube I had laying around.





I got both sets done, so I can stop worrying about it. Part of the method to the madness is to get a little more accustomed to working with this stuff because the right rear shock tower is going to be made from streamline tube. It's cool stuff, but so expensive you don't want to make any mistakes that lead to scrap.

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  #126  
Old 08-06-2014, 10:19 AM
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Does that stuff fit in your notcher?
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  #127  
Old 08-06-2014, 05:23 PM
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Does that stuff fit in your notcher?

Unfortunately not. I did these pieces by holding in the vise on the milling machine. I've thought about making a split block that is round on the outside with a diamond shaped hole inside to allow it to be held in the notcher but I haven't done it yet.
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  #128  
Old 08-11-2014, 08:33 AM
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I was able to get some shock brackets on the frame over the weekend.

Here's the left rear:



And a little closer view:



The main part of the bracket is 0.090" thick 4130 sheet that I made into a box section. It's braced back to the frame with a short piece of 1" x 0.065" wall round tube. If I were building the car over again, the tube this is attached to would be lower in the car (so the bracket would be shorter), but that's a consequence of changing the rear suspension from torsion bars to coil-overs.

And the beginning of the right side:



More streamline tube bling! This is 2.023" x 0.853" x 0.065" wall streamline, which is equivalent to 1.5" round in tension. The bungs on the end are made from 1.125" round bar, and they have a 7/8" counterbore for most of their length, except for 1/2" at the end. This allows a 9/16" socket to reach in to access the shock bolt. I have to make some 1/2" to 3/8" reducing/misalignment bushings to go in the shock bearing.

The trailing edge of the tube overhangs the frame a little bit, which is because I was trying to align the center of the tube with the node it's connected to. There will be a filler piece on the inside. I'm not terribly concerned about this because the top tubes are primarily loaded in compression.

Here's the view from the rear:



I got my wide spring base! There are two lower diagonal tubes missing in this picture that connect the two shock bungs back to the frame. I have the rear one fit and tacked, just need to do the front.

My next update should be of the car sitting on four wheels again!
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  #129  
Old 08-13-2014, 10:07 PM
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Grant is that your bouncy toy in the back ground?
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  #130  
Old 08-14-2014, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by chloeedad View Post
Grant is that your bouncy toy in the back ground?


It's not all race cars in this shop! That came down from the attic again now that #2 son is big enough to play in it. Here's a pic my wife snapped while I was "babysitting" last Saturday morning. Even got the big, furry kid in there...

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  #131  
Old 08-14-2014, 07:23 AM
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And we have a roller!!!















It rolls and steers...now I need to get to work on the "stop" part. The brake pedal assembly is up next.
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  #132  
Old 08-14-2014, 02:06 PM
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It rolls and steers...now I need to get to work on the "stop" part. The brake pedal assembly is up next.
Pffftttt....everyone knows racecars don't use brakes! Nah, just kidding, looking awesome Grant!
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  #133  
Old 08-14-2014, 04:29 PM
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I find a magnetic pickup tool works great to pick up the swarf that collects in the baby bouncer!

Neat work!
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  #134  
Old 09-29-2014, 07:12 AM
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Nothing super-exciting to report, but I did get the seat completely installed in the car this weekend. I had gotten the tubes done for the bottom of the seat quite a while ago. The last time Mark sat in the car, he wanted the seat raised a bit to get more comfortable in the car, so what I did over the weekend got that taken care of, as well as attaching the top portion of the seat to the car.

This is a ButlerBuilt seat with their full containment setup added to the top of it. The instructions are pretty specific about securely attaching the seat to the car and making sure that it's a rigid as possible.

I already had five 5/16" flat head screws countersunk into thick 2" diameter aluminum washers in the seat bottom. At this point, everything was still pretty floppy.

Next, I added these brackets to the seat itself, and the mating tabs on the car. These are just below shoulder height:



The brackets and tabs are 0.090" 4130 sheet, with a doubler around the bolt hole. This stiffened things up significantly, but the head support was still movable relative to the rest of the seat.

The final step was to add tabs to the car to secure the head support through the reinforcing flange around the outside. The outer tabs have a reinforcing gusset underneath due to their length.



This attaches to the car with 1/4" flat head screws, using 1/4" thick aluminum washers with the heads countersunk. I feel like these distribute the load around the screw holes much better, and should keep anything from tearing out in a heavy crash.

This thing is securely in the car now. Hopefully it's never really tested, but you have to treat these things like they're going to crash hard eventually.
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  #135  
Old 09-29-2014, 03:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
Nothing super-exciting to report, but I did get the seat completely installed in the car this weekend. I had gotten the tubes done for the bottom of the seat quite a while ago. The last time Mark sat in the car, he wanted the seat raised a bit to get more comfortable in the car, so what I did over the weekend got that taken care of, as well as attaching the top portion of the seat to the car.

This is a ButlerBuilt seat with their full containment setup added to the top of it. The instructions are pretty specific about securely attaching the seat to the car and making sure that it's a rigid as possible.

I already had five 5/16" flat head screws countersunk into thick 2" diameter aluminum washers in the seat bottom. At this point, everything was still pretty floppy.

Next, I added these brackets to the seat itself, and the mating tabs on the car. These are just below shoulder height:



The brackets and tabs are 0.090" 4130 sheet, with a doubler around the bolt hole. This stiffened things up significantly, but the head support was still movable relative to the rest of the seat.

The final step was to add tabs to the car to secure the head support through the reinforcing flange around the outside. The outer tabs have a reinforcing gusset underneath due to their length.



This attaches to the car with 1/4" flat head screws, using 1/4" thick aluminum washers with the heads countersunk. I feel like these distribute the load around the screw holes much better, and should keep anything from tearing out in a heavy crash.

This thing is securely in the car now. Hopefully it's never really tested, but you have to treat these things like they're going to crash hard eventually.
I spent Saturday night this week watching the ASCS South final show of the year. They started with 24 and ended with 11. It was mayhem, it would rain then stop and they would try and roll the track in. The sprints were hooked but there were 4 on their tops by the end.
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  #136  
Old 09-29-2014, 04:35 PM
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That's rough. I hate to see equipment get torn up like that.

I made the trip to Eldora for the Four Crown a little over a week ago. I love the place, but don't really care for the track prep. It starts out good, but always ends up a hard, slick dust bowl. Here's a few pics from the trip:



Running the track in right before hot laps:



The pits:



Chris Windom's Silver Crown ride:



I'm a big fan of the Silver Crown (Dirt Champ) cars. They're like a bigger, heavier sprint car. Lots of finesse required to run one of these big beasts!
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  #137  
Old 09-29-2014, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
That's rough. I hate to see equipment get torn up like that.

I made the trip to Eldora for the Four Crown a little over a week ago. I love the place, but don't really care for the track prep. It starts out good, but always ends up a hard, slick dust bowl. Here's a few pics from the trip:



Running the track in right before hot laps:



The pits:



Chris Windom's Silver Crown ride:



I'm a big fan of the Silver Crown (Dirt Champ) cars. They're like a bigger, heavier sprint car. Lots of finesse required to run one of these big beasts!
Eldora is a great Late Model track but I would much rather watch the sprints at the Knoxsville Nationals. We are going to Cocopah in November for the ASCS national show and we will be racing mod lites.
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  #138  
Old 09-29-2014, 05:05 PM
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Looking great Grant! You can never under build safety into a car, and it should never be taken for granted as well. I see cars all the time in the pits that make me scared for the driver's safety.

Just two weeks ago I finally had the luxury of joining the rollover club after 7 years of driving. The 15 car in the pic spun down the track and hooked my RR as I was went by, my car turned to the right, tripped over the LR, and over I went two times. Luckily the only thing hurt was the car (which is my dad's, whoops) and my ego.


And man do I need to go to Eldora some day!
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  #139  
Old 09-29-2014, 05:42 PM
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Those 1/4" thick aluminum washers look cool as hell. I wonder how functional they are compared to a similarly sized steel fender washer. Did you make them yourself or find them some place?
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  #140  
Old 09-29-2014, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Those 1/4" thick aluminum washers look cool as hell. I wonder how functional they are compared to a similarly sized steel fender washer. Did you make them yourself or find them some place?
Thanks! I made these. I'm sure they're probably stronger than a fender washer because they're about 4x the thickness. I got the idea from the hardware short course trucks use to secure their fiberglass, so I'm sure someone out there sells them.
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