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  #181  
Old 04-10-2013, 05:55 AM
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350 Vortec 350 Vortec is offline
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Lots of lovely work as usual Jaysin
See the E lockers fairly regular around here,i like the cable conversion idea but for me it looks a little bulky and dare i say ugly compared to the rest of the truck
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  #182  
Old 04-11-2013, 07:20 PM
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I have to agree with Vortec. Fab looks awesome, but that thing is big enough to attach a traction bar to (hint hint)
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  #183  
Old 04-21-2013, 01:18 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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Progress.
If you can remember back so many moons ago when I started this silly project I showed a really bashed up driver's side B-pillar and at some point I think I mentioned that I went to the junk yard and cut a replacement corner from another truck. Well I finally managed to get the time to replace the smashed with the not smashed.

The smashed. Here you can see that I have used a spot weld cutter to cut away all the spot welds around the perimeter.


And in this picture I have also cut it across the top as well and the whole piece is removed. I didn't do the same spot weld removal across the top because the b-piller outer skin was sandwiched between the inner structure and the roof at the top. It would have been very difficult (nigh impossible) to disassemble the corner at the roof without removing the entire roof. A little more work then I wanted to do.


Just shows how the rear of it came apart.


At this point I should mention that before one can start fitting the new skin in place on any repair like this you must grind off all the little spot welded circles that are left behind by the cutter. I should also mention that once I was happy with the fit around the perimeter I scribed a line at the top where the new skin overlapped the top piece of the old skin that I had left in place. Then I removed the new skin and carefully trimmed to the scribe line so that the new and old pieces would butt together. Sorry I didn't get pictures of this.

Here is the new corner tacked in place.


With the panel still only tacked in place I also reinstalled the door striker at this point so I could make sure the door still closed properly and the panel gaps and alignment were correct.


Alignment and fit looks reasonably good. To be honest these first gen trucks did leave a bit to be desired in the fit and finish department After all the bodies were still hand assembled and hand spot welded.


And here's that top butt joint. I have tacked it in place with MIG but I will grind these tacks flush and TIG the joint closed. Anytime you do a butt joint in a panel the fit must be as close to perfect as you can get it. You should always strive for zero gap between the two panels and if you are TIG or O&A welding the joint then you should never have a gap of more then 1/32" max. If you MIG the joint (which I don't recommend) then a wee bit more gap is acceptable. If you are having problems with excessive warpage after welding it is most likely too much heat or TOO BIG OF A GAP. Poor fit at a butt joint will cause all manner of difficulty.


And here all of the spot weld holes in the new panel have been filled in with MIG and ground back flush. It will take just a skim of body filler to make this repair disappear. I also need to get some body seam sealer to reseal the panel here at the rear vertical seam.


And at the top we have the TIG joint all finished. From the looks of it here it will not need more then a little filler primer to make this seam go away.


Next bodywork will be taking the windshield out to repair a little rust holes at the bottom front corners on both driver's and passenger's sides.

I have also rebuilt the 63" chevy springs that I installed in the rear. Dissembled, cleaned and painted the leaves. And went to Sacramento Spring to get all the anti-friction pads that keep the leaves separated. For those in the Sacto area, Sac Spring is the best spring shop I have found and if they don't have a part they will order it or just make it for you, really a great old school spring shop.

The rear axle housing has been modified for the e-locker, is all cleaned, painted and has been reassembled with all new wheel bearings, seals and o-rings, etc... So all the drivetrain is now reconditioned and should be good for another 200K miles.

We're getting closer to getting back on and off road soon.

Thanx for looking,
Jaysin
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  #184  
Old 04-29-2013, 11:58 PM
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elwood73 elwood73 is offline
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thank you for providing some of us a lot off useful info, keep on building.
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  #185  
Old 05-03-2013, 11:18 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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Well here's a sh!t update for you.

In trying to get the cab/fenders cleaned up for the repaint and having already repaired the driver's rear corner, I pulled out the crappy carpet (which I will replace with molded vinyl floor) and I found the dreaded rust.

Driver's side front cab floor.


Passenger's side front cab floor.


So now I will have to make even more sheet metal parts, it's a good thing I am good at the sheet metal work. Toyota really F'd up the design here, three layers of sheet metal without seam sealer on the exposed seams. And this is a Cali truck I can not imagine what the rust belt trucks look like.

I also found that the driver's front fender was a bondo sculpture. Apparently the same bondo (body) man that repaired the rear cab corner also repaired the front fender. At this point I have it all back within 1/64" and I think that is where I will stop and let a wee bit of filler do the rest.







I had to do a fair amount of torch shrinking below the marker light hole as the area was horribly stretched and had a 3/16" bulge. I also had to shrink the area behind the marker light hole because it was also stretched and oil canning badly. The dark spots are the guide coat that I sprayed on to make the lows show up better, they look bad but you can barely feel any of them. While it was more work that I didn't really want to have to do it is now done and ready for some filler primer and blocking.

So you can look forward to more sheet metal work updates soon.

One step forward, three steps back.

Jaysin
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  #186  
Old 05-04-2013, 12:26 AM
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alwaysFlOoReD alwaysFlOoReD is offline
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I'd be really interested in how you shrink metal. If you have a chance....
Thanks for taking the time to show your work,

Richard
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  #187  
Old 05-04-2013, 12:55 AM
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Ditto. I don't know what oil canning is either.
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  #188  
Old 05-04-2013, 11:46 AM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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I will try to do a tutorial on torch shrinking and post it up next week, as this is a fairly complex process.

Oil cans used to have a flat bottom that you popped back and forth to squirt the oil out. Today it is more common to see the same thing on the metal lids of Snapple bottles or a Mason jar canning lid (the bit that stays down when the canned goods are sealed and pops up when the seal is broken). If you've ever leaned against someone's car and had the door skin or fender pop in from your weight only to have it pop back out as soon as you remove your weight, that is oil canning. The reason that this happens is because, at some point in the panel's life, it has been pushed just a bit too far and has been stretched so that it is slightly larger then the space it inhabits.

Jaysin
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  #189  
Old 05-04-2013, 12:54 PM
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Thanks for explaining. I wasn't sure what you meant, but that makes sense.
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  #190  
Old 05-04-2013, 07:56 PM
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LOL!
You now have more old-skewl body shop hours in it then it is worth
Well done

E
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  #191  
Old 05-07-2013, 12:17 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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Yep, this is the problem with being picky about doing things right. That and having a friend tell you that the truck has no crash damage and no rust, it's a good thing I only paid $400 for the truck.

For me too though, the body work is also classroom time. I have done a lot of panel replacement and cutting and welding but when it comes to shrinking as much out of that fender as I did to restore crash damage those hours are learning time. If I had ruined that fender there is a replacement in nearly every junkyard but now I would feel confident doing that much shrinking on something old and rare.

I like to try things that are above my head on my junk before I do it on a customer's rare parts.

On a side note I spent the weekend driving to the coast where some friends of my folks live and having them give me some great blacksmithing tools. Two coal forges, a recuperative propane furnace, better then a dozen hammers and striking tools (top fuller, chisels, flatter,etc...), post vice and table and about 300 lbs of coke for the coal forges. These are some of the most unbelievably nice people I have ever met.

Thanx,
Jaysin
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  #192  
Old 05-07-2013, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaysinSpaceman View Post
Yep, this is the problem with being picky about doing things right. That and having a friend tell you that the truck has no crash damage and no rust, it's a good thing I only paid $400 for the truck.

For me too though, the body work is also classroom time. I have done a lot of panel replacement and cutting and welding but when it comes to shrinking as much out of that fender as I did to restore crash damage those hours are learning time. If I had ruined that fender there is a replacement in nearly every junkyard but now I would feel confident doing that much shrinking on something old and rare.

I like to try things that are above my head on my junk before I do it on a customer's rare parts.

On a side note I spent the weekend driving to the coast where some friends of my folks live and having them give me some great blacksmithing tools. Two coal forges, a recuperative propane furnace, better then a dozen hammers and striking tools (top fuller, chisels, flatter,etc...), post vice and table and about 300 lbs of coke for the coal forges. These are some of the most unbelievably nice people I have ever met.

Thanx,
Jaysin
Cool, black-smithy work is fascinating
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  #193  
Old 05-11-2013, 12:49 AM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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To continue on with the body work phase of this project. And now for sure I have spent more hours then this cab will ever be worth, but then that is not why we take on these projects, is it?

I didn't really take pictures as I went but I think this mid way update will give you the Idea.

After I cut the rust out, cleaned up, used phosphoric acid to convert the rust that was left and then primed and painted the body mount it looked like this...


For those that might notice I had to also patch the mount itself because there was a fair size hole rusted all the way through.

I also had to remove one of the floor braces because the patch needed to go about 1/4" under the brace. Cut out the spot welds and popped it off. You can see the brace in the bottom of the picture.


This is the patch I had to make up. I made a male and female "die" to press the recess for the body mount bolt, I say "die" because it was just made out of MDF but it works for the two parts that I needed. Before I pressed the recess in I stretched the area to be pressed with the english wheel because I knew that it would take a lot of material to go 1/2" deep on that recess. Once the recess was in I had to spend some time manipulating the rest of the piece, a little stretching here, a little shrinking there, a few good smacks with the hammer and voila.


The driver's side isn't finished yet but the passenger's side is, so that is what we have a picture of here. The patch is welded in around the perimeter, spot welded to the body mount (we wouldn't want it to rattle) and spot welded at the fire wall seam. I didn't spend a huge amount of time finishing it as it is all going to get covered with peal-n-seal, insulation, and vinyl floor, hopefully it will never be seen again.


All in all it's really a fairly minor setback and another two or three hours and it will be a thing of the past. I keep making headway where I can (sometimes it feels like one step forward and four steps back) and hopefully by the end of summer it will be rolling down the road.

Thanx for playing along at home,
Jaysin
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  #194  
Old 05-11-2013, 05:39 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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The setback of cab floor rust is finished. Just welded in the driver's side repair panel and the brace. The last of the rust that needs fixing is two wee spots at the bottom corners of the windshield. Hopefully within a couple of weeks I will have the interior color changed and be nearly ready to repaint the body. I will have to pull the engine to paint the engine compartment first which is why I say "hopefully" it will be ready to repaint.

Don't forget to tune in for the next exciting installment.
Jaysin
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  #195  
Old 05-11-2013, 07:30 PM
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Can you snap a photo of your MDF dies? Could be a good alternative to expensive dimple dies for onesy-twosy parts.
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  #196  
Old 06-06-2013, 02:24 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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Bandit, Sorry I missed your request for pictures of the MDF dies. I don't have any but they are way too simple. A small circle of MDF for the male die (cut out with a hole saw) and a square of MDF about 2" bigger then the hole cut out of the middle of it (again with a hole saw) for the female die. Align by eye, heavy plate steel above and below and press with 20 tons.

Hope that 'splains it.
Jaysin
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  #197  
Old 06-06-2013, 02:43 PM
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Thanks for the reply! I'm thinking about using the same method to stamp fan shroud features replicating your bead-rolled insets (if I can fit the corners of my shroud into the press). Does the material around the bend remain reasonably flat afterwards? Did you "coin" it a bit when pressing or do you air bend?
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Last edited by TheBandit; 06-06-2013 at 03:02 PM.
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  #198  
Old 06-06-2013, 03:04 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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On to another update. You know how they say "it's the little things that take time", well they're F'ing right.

I didn't like where the PS pump was mounted, it made the high and low pressure hose routing all funky and it was also just plain in the way for the lower coolant hose and it was close to steering bits (not close enough to hit but too close for comfort). So I made up some brackets and relocated it above the alternator. It's now easier to get to and much better hose routing.







Well relocating the PS pump let me reroute the lower coolant hose as well. The problem was that even though the PS pump was now out of the picture the thermostat housing still had the hose outlet to the back and with a 180 U-turn in the hose it still wasn't making me happy. So out came the calipers and a few hours and one 3.5" diameter chunk of aluminum bar stock later I had a new thermostat housing.

This is how it looked after it came out of my little Sheldon Lathe.




And a little layout, poke some holes on the drill press, some band saw work and cleanup on the belt sander and...


You'll notice I had to notch it to clear the block.


The thermostat side is tapered for good flow.


Mounted.


And with the hose, much better routing.


And I finally bit the bullet and bought my Viair Compressor. I designed a mount for it and a secondary battery to hang under the flatbed. The mount was cut from 12g material and all TIG welded together. I temporarily clamped it it place and ran it up to pressure and it isn't nearly as loud and the one I heard in a Jeep a while back. In fact I am quite pleased with the noise level and don't think it will be too annoying when the truck is running. If I had to guess I would say the one in the Jeep was very poorly mounted.







I still need to weld the bolting reinforcement to the flatbed frame but it is close.

That's it for now I hope to have more soon.

Thanx for following along.
Jaysin
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  #199  
Old 06-06-2013, 03:38 PM
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Twisted Minis Twisted Minis is offline
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Awesomeness.
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  #200  
Old 07-07-2013, 10:12 PM
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slacker slacker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaysinSpaceman View Post


So now I will have to make even more sheet metal parts, it's a good thing I am good at the sheet metal work. Toyota really F'd up the design here, three layers of sheet metal without seam sealer on the exposed seams. And this is a Cali truck I can not imagine what the rust belt trucks look like.

I know your a "metal" guy .. but maybe check out some FRP parts . all NEW technology .. tough as nails
http://www.toyotafiberglass.com


.

Last edited by slacker; 07-07-2013 at 10:14 PM.
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