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  #681  
Old 10-06-2016, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by CarterKraft View Post
And so it goes, until I see otherwise I will mega fuse it at the battery.
That doesn't seem like too bad an idea, although it may not help with the alternator charge line since in the case of a short, the battery fuse would not be in the current path.

I used 4awg wire on my alternator. I don't think the wire itself is the concern if it has a short - the insulation is typically a non flammable material - it's more of an issue of what kind of heat and fire happens locally to the short. Circuit protection is designed to put a quick stop to that. If you wanted protection, you would have to put a large fuse right at the output of the alternator, but even then the alternator has a maximum output - I don't think you will ever blow your fuse even if it is putting out max current into a short, unless you size your fuse below the max output of the alternator.
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  #682  
Old 10-06-2016, 02:00 PM
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I believe you are right on all counts. I have experienced internally shorted alternators in the past but the current seemed limited, likely due to the capacity of the failed diode etc.

The major source of "fire" is from the battery not the alternator, 750A vs 150A.
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  #683  
Old 10-06-2016, 02:06 PM
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I like the idea of putting a Megafuse on the battery. Blue sea has some nice looking holders for those.
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  #684  
Old 10-06-2016, 03:32 PM
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Since we're on the topic of wiring safety, it might be a good time to mention that I picked up a Ford inertia switch for the fuel pump. I've been involving my son as much as I can lately, so perhaps it's best if I let him explain how it works. Here is a video: http://cjnn.xtremefabricator.com/ima...rtiaswitch.mp4

Bellow is a photo of the switch itself. It has a reset button in case I get in a fender bender. Playing around with this thing, it seems to react in all directions except "up" - i.e. if you tap hard from the sides or top, it will open the switch, but if you tap from the bottom it will not. This may be by design to prevent the switch from going off when you hit a hard pothole. Otherwise it should kill power to the fuel pump if hit from the side or if I landed on my roof.



I have not had a chance to install it yet. My last month plus went into a black hole at work.
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  #685  
Old 10-24-2016, 12:34 PM
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I mounted the Ford inertia switch on a support panel in the trunk, next to a Zettler 50amp relay and MTA Maxi fuse holder. One of my favorite "tools" I learned about on OFN (thanks Defender Chassis!) is this Fastcap long nose pattern marker, which has a long, skinny tip for deep/long hole transfers. It was especially useful here for locating a mounting hole, because the panel is not flat and there was a sizable gap that I needed to bridge with a spacer. I used steel ribbed rivet nuts for mounting everything.







Everything is tucked between the battery box and the tail panel, but I have just enough room for my hands to change the fuse or reset the inertia switch.

The wiring is setup as follows: the ECM supplies low current +12v to the inertia switch when commanding fuel pump on. The inertia switch then passes that low current +12v to the relay. The relay switches a high current +12v feed from a 30amp Maxi fuse to the fuel pump, over 10awg GXL wires. If the inertia switch trips, the relay will de-energize, stopping the fuel pump.

Below are some random photos of wire runs in the trunk. These are just zip tied in place for now; I will add loom after the car is running. The fuel pump wires feed through an Essentra IP67 (watertight) grommet in the trunk. I added a Metripack 280 connector so it can be disconnected for service. It meets up with a pair of 18awg wires running from the front of the car along the sill plate: one for the ECM fuel pump signal and the other to power the master shutoff relay from isolated power on the "4 pole" battery disconnect. That pair of wires has a Metripack 150 connnector so it too can be disconnected for service. I am trying to think ahead to eventually needing to strip the car down for paint.



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  #686  
Old 10-24-2016, 01:00 PM
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Next I needed a bracket to mount my jump start post. I had an old aluminum collet organizer in my stash which had the right hole size, so I cut it up with the porta-band (I wish I had a "real" bandsaw), bent it in the vise, and drilled a couple mounting holes.







I mounted it in front of the air cleaner on the radiator support using a pair of rivet nuts and stainless cap screws. This is where the main 1/0awg feed from the battery splits off to the starter (1/0awg) and the alternator/distribution post (4awg). I have the 1/0 wires crimped, but I still need to add shrink tubing and terminate the 4awg wire. I may also attach a small sheet of plastic around this to prevent accidental grounding. I added this jump start post, because the battery box is screwed shut and there isn't a good place to jump from otherwise. Sometimes I think I'm the only person in the world that carries jumper cables - I find myself helping neighbors or random people stranded in parking lots at least a few times a year.

After that, I decided it was time to take a break from wiring and knock out some hose connections here and there. First was the brake booster. The LSx intake manifolds have a large barb on the back that accepts 1/2" hose, but the vacuum check valve on my booster accepts 3/8". I scoured the autoparts store looking for an alternate check valve that would accept larger hose, but I could not find one, so I picked up a 3/8" x 1/2" brass elbow, painted it black, and stuck it here. The elbow helps a bit with routing the line anyway.



Next I needed a way to get fresh air into the crankcase for the PCV system. The OEM and many aftermarket valve covers include a baffled 3/8" barb connection for this purpose, but the GMPP valve covers I'm using do not. Rather than welding something on, I figured I could use the standard breather hole, but I had no luck finding a simple pass-through breather with a 3/8" connection - everything I came across included a PCV valve. So I found one suitable for taking apart. It's a Cal Custom CAL-188489 aluminum unit, which had a snap ring to retain what looks like your basic parts-store PCV valve inside of a fancier aluminum housing. I gutted it and popped it into the valve cover.





The fresh air side of the PCV system needs to connect to filtered, metered air (otherwise it will behave like a vacuum leak). So I picked up a weld in aluminum barb from eBay seller "sweetperformance" located in nearby Placentia, CA.



I also picked up a 1/8" NPT weld in bung for my radiator, which I will use for the steam line coming off the cylinder heads. It is welded in at a higher location than the heads, which should help burp air from the system.



I did not do the welding on either of these fittings, because I don't have a TIG welder. I just drilled the holes with a step bit and took them to the local shop Bones Fabrication.

Getting extremely close now. I need to run transmission coolant lines, add hoses and clamps everywhere, wire the MIL and ignition power wires, add fluids, and call the tuner.
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  #687  
Old 10-24-2016, 01:03 PM
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Clean and well thought out.

Where are you getting the grommets?
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  #688  
Old 10-24-2016, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarterKraft View Post
Clean and well thought out.

Where are you getting the grommets?
Thanks! They are IP67 sealing grommets from Essentra: http://us.essentracomponents.com/en-...ement/grommets I requested a few samples and they are great.
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  #689  
Old 10-24-2016, 01:25 PM
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Looking really good. The list is getting shorter, which is always exciting.

Dan
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  #690  
Old 10-24-2016, 01:58 PM
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This all looks really good. Great detective work on finding a fitting to work with the existing breather hole/grommet in the valve cover! Much cleaner than drilling another hole on the valve cover. The VC's that I'm running on my race car have had a couple mods to accommodate different dry sump configurations and all the extra fittings drive me nuts.
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  #691  
Old 10-24-2016, 06:26 PM
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Thanks! They are IP67 sealing grommets from Essentra: http://us.essentracomponents.com/en-...ement/grommets I requested a few samples and they are great.
Ok, maybe OT question but...

I requested some samples from Ladd Industries (a very special multi-pin Deutsch HD receptacle and sockets). They sent exactly what I asked and I was overjoyed, then guilt stricken.
What is the word on samples in the professional world?

I am not in a position to purchase the units required to make it worth there while, but do they even care?

After you mentioned the grommet earlier I tried to find a place to buy them but couldn't, that's why I ended up using the bulkhead fitting I happened to have off a piece of equipment I work on, the mating receptacle I was missing.
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  #692  
Old 10-24-2016, 06:47 PM
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CarterKraft - I've bought a lot of this stuff and take advantage of samples as a machine integrator, so I'll offer my OPINION. There are some competing factors / business models to weigh along with the ethics.

First, there is not much money in onsie-twosie (spelling?) quantities of mass-produced stuff like what I'm using here, at least not for an OEM whose core competency is designing and manufacturing product. The value of the item is on the same order of magnitude (or even much smaller) than what it costs to transact the sale, so a business like Essentra is not counting on profiting by selling one or those of these - the revenues simply aren't high enough to support the overhead. But it's also hard to sell bulk for OEM integration without somehow providing samples. So they eat the very small cost of providing the samples to avoid the high cost of selling them at these low quantities. Perhaps they will send out dozens of samples to people like me who may never order another component from them again, but every so often a design engineer will pick up a sample and decide to add it into their product, resulting in volume sales.

There are 3rd party business models like what McMaster or Mouser or Digikey run where they go ahead and buy/inventory bulk of items like those above, mark them up heavily and/or package in semi-bulk form, and unload them for profit. In that case their core competency is not manufacturing or designing the product, but instead cataloging and inventorying a large number of products in order to sell a few at higher margins.

Do they care? Sure of course they care. They don't want to be taken advantage of. But for small numbers how much they care relative to how much they make or lose is an easy tradeoff. Spend money vetting all the people requesting samples or just send them out as the request comes in - I'm sure they track the costs and reassess this tradeoff periodically.

I would be happy to buy their product, especially now that I know what it is, and I will probably suggest using it on some of the test and lab equipment I have custom built. They earned my future business with these samples.
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  #693  
Old 10-24-2016, 07:18 PM
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Fair enough.
What I was hoping to not have done is take a freebie intended for someone else. The OEM's we sell product for (mainly CAT) are a huge purchaser of Deutsch products but I have no say in that decision.

The connector is sweet in my opinion and I will try to use it more on stuff like this.
When LADD didn't email me back about my sample request I went ahead and purchased all the stuff elsewhere only to have the LADD stuff show up the same time the other stuff did. I am sure other vendors sell it too.

https://laddinc.com/product/?sku=HDP26-24-18SE-L017
The 8, 12 and 16 contact sizes all in one connector solves allot of headaches for me.
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  #694  
Old 10-26-2016, 12:41 PM
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There are some really fascinating connectors out there if you are an aspiring wiring geek amateur like me. Years ago I interviewed for a job at Cooper Interconnect. During the interview, they showed me these enormous connectors that linked missiles to submarines. They were setup to detach as the missile was fired. The attachment and the detachment have to be incredibly reliable on these things, not to mention every one of the hundreds of connections, which spend their lives in sea water / air. Pretty cool stuff.

I really like using all these OEM-style connectors, but it is also a pain to find the right connectors, terminals, seals, TPAs, CPAs, and crimpers for every wire size. It's also pretty expensive. I could have bought a ready-made harness for pennies compared to what I've spent on this.
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  #695  
Old 10-26-2016, 03:29 PM
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That's some cool stuff, mil-spec is #1.

I try to use only the connectors I can find. I sort of have an unlimited supply of many connectors but often a I can only get one side, that was the case with this connector.
It was as rare as a unicorn fart and the mating connector was $60 retail with #8 pins/sockets at $8 each (ouch).

Can't wait for you to get this project done, it's my subconscious motivation.
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  #696  
Old 10-26-2016, 04:05 PM
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Last night I got all the coolant, power steering, and PCV hoses clamped on. I also ran a 4awg wire from the jump post to the main distribution terminal on the driver's side. I added shrink tubing on all the 1/0 and 4awg terminals. I'm a weekend from having it ready, but I haven't scheduled the tuner to come out yet. I figure I better check circuits, check bolts/connectors, add fluids, prime the fuel system, prime the oiling system, etc before I have somebody show up on the clock. Plus I really need to clean / pickup the shop area around the car so it's easy to spot leaks.
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  #697  
Old 10-26-2016, 05:57 PM
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I could have bought a ready-made harness for pennies compared to what I've spent on this.
I often find this to be the case when I get the bright idea to do something myself. But then I would have the same one as everyone else instead of the only example in existence...

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  #698  
Old 11-02-2016, 03:14 PM
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I finally painted the fan shroud and installed the fan. I did not adequately protect the raw sheetmetal from rust, but I was able to get most of it off using Evaporust (spray, let sit, scour, rinse, repeat). I gotta say I really love that stuff - it actually does work as advertised. I also added hose clamps everywhere as needed.



Below you can see the wiring going to the jump start post. The 1/0 line on the right is coming from the battery disconnect in the trunk. The 1/0 line on the left runs to the starter. The 4awg wire runs along the bottom/front of the radiator support to the main distribution post on the passenger side (which is incidentally where the alternator connects). At some point I need to punch a hole in here someplace for cold air to the filter.



One of the last items on the list was the transmission coolant lines. I hate doing anything transmission related because I am hoping to eventually ditch this TH400 for a proper grab-handle with a third pedal. Anyway, transmission fluid enters the integrated radiator/trans cooler through 3/8" Summit push-lock hose and a 1/4NPT to AN adapter. It then exits the top of the radiator and runs through a hardline to the bottom of a second auxiliary cooler at the front of the car. Finally it makes it sway back to the transmission through the same type of hose.





With the AC mounted low on the passenger side along with the starter cable and the waterpump inlet, there wasn't much room for transmission lines in the conventional location, so I opted to have them route along the outside of the frame, underneath the upper control arm.



I want to thank juicedz4 for turning me on to these awesome snap-in plastic clamps available from McMaster Carr - they are perfect for this kind of thing! I will warn, however, that I had to reorder one size bigger than what they were advertised to fit. I think they are sized for hard tubing where it is okay for the plastic to clamp pretty hard, but it did not work for hose. So while my hose is 9/16" OD, I used clamps sized for 5/8-3/4" OD (McMaster P/N 7429K46).





Here is where the transmission lines connect to the TH400. I used 1/4" NPS (national pipe straight) to -6AN adapters. DO NOT use NPT (national pipe taper) for these - it will thread in and you can probably get it to seal, but it the taper stresses the housing and can lead to cracks.



Another item to note is that the TCI flexplate I am using required longer bolts that what I had for my SBC. The old SBC bolts were 7/16-20 x 3/4" long. I picked up some ARP 230-7303 7/16-20 x 1-1/4" long bolts to replace them.



Here are some walk-around photos of the near-finished product.









I have been going around testing circuits and so far things are mostly checking out. The starter cranks. The ECM turns on the MIL (check engine lamp) when IGN power is applied and it runs the fuel pump for a few seconds to prime as expected. The drive-by-wire throttle body responds to input from the accelerator pedal (which goes well with the simulated engine sounds I make "vroom vroom"). The power on relay clicks on and off when IGN is applied, providing juice to the injectors and coils as expected.

I attempted to connect an OBD2 reader, but found I have the CAN bus high and low wires reversed in the OBD2 connector (whoops), so I will need to swap those pins and hopefully it will work after that. Once I get that sorted out, I will start adding fluids and schedule the tuner to come put a start up tune on it.
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  #699  
Old 11-03-2016, 08:41 AM
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Very nice! I've been following along on IG, so cool to see this all come together. Very happy for you!
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:56 AM
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I'll just leave this here:::::: http://driveusca.com/
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