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Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.


Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.

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  #41  
Old 12-09-2008, 08:52 PM
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we have a drill doctor at work and i never use it , tried a couple of times but to me it,s a waste of $$$ i,d rather invest in a nice 6" Baldor bench grinder and have a more versetial tool . i,ve been in the machinist trade for over 20yrs and learned how to sharpen drills by hand , it,s no different then learning to weld or fabricate it takes time to learn but once you get the basics your set . now that we are onto sharpneing drills if you do them by hand like i do don,t waste your $$ on split tip drillbits ya they cut nice but are designed to be sharpened on a proper drill sharpeing machine , the split tip design has a thicker web then the non split tip design so sharpening them can be a real pain .
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  #42  
Old 12-10-2008, 04:27 AM
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Goggled The drill doctor and they are like 60 notes over here and $90 your side fooook me i think i will be able to live with out one.

Good set of scribes are great tooo nowt worse than having to use a screwdriveror rule to mark something out
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  #43  
Old 12-11-2008, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefrombc View Post
we have a drill doctor at work and i never use it , tried a couple of times but to me it,s a waste of $$$ i,d rather invest in a nice 6" Baldor bench grinder and have a more versetial tool . i,ve been in the machinist trade for over 20yrs and learned how to sharpen drills by hand , it,s no different then learning to weld or fabricate it takes time to learn but once you get the basics your set . now that we are onto sharpneing drills if you do them by hand like i do don,t waste your $$ on split tip drillbits ya they cut nice but are designed to be sharpened on a proper drill sharpeing machine , the split tip design has a thicker web then the non split tip design so sharpening them can be a real pain .
You can re-sharpen any drill bit into a split tip with a small cutoff tool. I use a 3" cutoff wheel on an air cutoff tool.
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  #44  
Old 12-11-2008, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Corban_White View Post
You can re-sharpen any drill bit into a split tip with a small cutoff tool. I use a 3" cutoff wheel on an air cutoff tool.
that is true but they never seem to cut as good as they do from the factory , call me oldschool LOL i still prefer the standard jobber drill bit over the split tip
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  #45  
Old 12-11-2008, 10:25 PM
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After my welder i bought a good band saw. it is important to have accurate cuts.
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  #46  
Old 12-11-2008, 11:39 PM
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Fire extinguisher.
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  #47  
Old 12-13-2008, 06:27 AM
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Nice one bud defo a good idea. A good work surface is a must i have yet to build one, at the mo i build engines on the floor and metal work on my lap but that will hopefully change soon.
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  #48  
Old 12-13-2008, 10:49 AM
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Pry bars and a line up bar.
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  #49  
Old 12-13-2008, 05:00 PM
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Jizer / duck oil either in a spray bottle or bath as you cant beat clean tools or clean components when your repairing or welding.
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  #50  
Old 12-13-2008, 07:26 PM
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Fire extinguisher, safety glasses, ear muffs, Mill, Lathe, TIG.... in that order

...after that you start building you own tools
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  #51  
Old 12-21-2008, 01:54 AM
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Talking

It sort of really comes down to what you do!! or should I say prefer to do.

In this part of the country there is very little public land so not really much demand for cages except for track cars..

Working in the field I soon learned I needed two sets of tools one was left in the Truck or job box in those long out of state jobs.

So it wasn`t left in the wrong place when really needed.

Safety glasses have gotten much better since 30 years ago. I now wear safety glasses and ear plugs all the time when doing anything loud or with the chance of flying metal
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Some days it takes longer to pick which welder

then to do the welding
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  #52  
Old 12-21-2008, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by wyoming9 View Post
It sort of really comes down to what you do!! or should I say prefer to do.

In this part of the country there is very little public land so not really much demand for cages except for track cars..

Working in the field I soon learned I needed two sets of tools one was left in the Truck or job box in those long out of state jobs.

So it wasn`t left in the wrong place when really needed.

Safety glasses have gotten much better since 30 years ago. I now wear safety glasses and ear plugs all the time when doing anything loud or with the chance of flying metal

i don,t work in my shop without ear plugs or glasses on , i need the glasses to see up close now LOL but regardless both are in use even if i,m sweeping the floor , force of habit after 21yrs in the trade
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  #53  
Old 01-02-2009, 11:59 PM
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Originally Posted by wyoming9 View Post
Safety glasses have gotten much better since 30 years ago. I now wear safety glasses and ear plugs all the time when doing anything loud or with the chance of flying metal
Could you repeat that I didn't quite hear what you said!
I wish I had learned to use ear plugs alot sooner! At least I did learn to use saftey glasses befor any permanant damage was done to my eyes.

The one "Tool" I wish I had is a real shop with real concrete floors, a roof and four walls.
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  #54  
Old 01-07-2009, 12:57 AM
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Exclamation

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Originally Posted by SLUJeeper View Post
Fire extinguisher, safety glasses, ear muffs, Mill, Lathe, TIG.... in that order

...after that you start building you own tools
This is a good way to go.
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  #55  
Old 01-07-2009, 05:54 AM
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A few months back, there was a one week buggy build on Pirate at Shannon Campbells shop. They had lots of great tools, shears, brakes, different welders and such. But in an interview with Shannon's Dad, they asked what tool he used the most, it was a vertical Bandsaw.

Now I pose the question to you guys, would you prefer a nice vertical bandsaw to cut out brakets or a plasma and have to clean up the edges afterwards.

I know the plasma is way more portable, but I thought I would throw it out there.
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  #56  
Old 01-07-2009, 05:31 PM
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Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by BAM BAM View Post
A few months back, there was a one week buggy build on Pirate at Shannon Campbells shop. They had lots of great tools, shears, brakes, different welders and such. But in an interview with Shannon's Dad, they asked what tool he used the most, it was a vertical Bandsaw.

Now I pose the question to you guys, would you prefer a nice vertical bandsaw to cut out brakets or a plasma and have to clean up the edges afterwards.

I know the plasma is way more portable, but I thought I would throw it out there.

I would pick the bandsaw first, unless the plasma cutter was a cnc.
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  #57  
Old 01-26-2009, 09:10 PM
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Fridge fully stocked with rockstar and beer, ipod with all the music you ever heard at a bar, A poster of San Felipe or whatever off road spot fills your void, and a Rich old lady to pay for it all. PRICELESS.
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  #58  
Old 02-04-2009, 02:06 PM
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I am new to the forum and have a question for those who have a horizontal band saw and cold saw where is the money best spent? A small cold saw http://grizzly.com/products/12-Slow-...th-Stand/G0682 or band saw http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-...-Bandsaw/G9743
Thanks
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  #59  
Old 02-04-2009, 03:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toyshop View Post
I am new to the forum and have a question for those who have a horizontal band saw and cold saw where is the money best spent? A small cold saw http://grizzly.com/products/12-Slow-...th-Stand/G0682 or band saw http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-...-Bandsaw/G9743
Thanks
Welcome!
Also consider a dry-cut saw. Considerably less and quite a workhorse. Probably the fastest way to cut there is. There are many brands out there. I'm personally familiar with the Milwaukee and the Evolution.
And not to pass up the op for a shameless plug visit http://www.medfordtools.com/evolution/evo355.html
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  #60  
Old 02-04-2009, 04:49 PM
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1) Patience
2) Imagination
3) Every tool related to the job you perform to make the job easier.

The first two are imperative. The last is obvious.
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