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Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.


Fabrication 101 Everyone has to start somewhere and for some, theOFN might be that somewhere.

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  #21  
Old 04-02-2007, 05:23 PM
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Wicked one Wicked one is offline
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oxy acetylene

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Originally Posted by Captainfab View Post
There are cutting tips smaller than 0, I've used 000 and I think there may even be a 0000. The smaller tips of course are good for lighter material and also for doing detailed cutting on a little heavier material. For instance I've used the 000 for doing detailed cutting on 1/4" with excellent results. For pressures 8# on the acetylene and 21# on the oxygen is what I use for most tips and materials.
All this talk about pressure is great but!!! It all depends on your equipment. Some manufacturers recommend more or less than other's. So you should start with their base line settings. Cutting pressure is slightly different than welding pressure. 3# acetylene and 30# oxygen was what was taught when I was an apprentice many moon's ago , now that was the answer they wanted on their test (which dosen't work so well in the real world). The smallest tip victor makes is a 000 which is good for cutting 1/8 material. They recommend 20 -25 psi oxygen and 3-5 psi acetylene so all I can tell you guys is to read the manual that comes with your equipment and you should be close. If your useing 8# of acetylene I would get my regulator checked for a 000 that seems like an enourmous amount. Just my opinion. Jef
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  #22  
Old 04-02-2007, 05:32 PM
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Seems my guages need replacing, might just need to get new setup... yippie more tool purchases
Thanks for all the info guys..
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  #23  
Old 04-02-2007, 10:16 PM
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what i mentioned should be taken as a starting point, not set in stone. Every torch will need slightly different adjustments. I've never seen a tip smaller then 0 but good to know.
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  #24  
Old 04-07-2007, 08:41 PM
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This is all good info. I currently have a cutting/welding kit but no bottles. I've heard people tell me to just rent the bottles per project as opposed to buying a set. Any help with that. I'm not an everyday fabricator but when the time comes to need the torch I would hate to have to rely on the store to be open to rent one.
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  #25  
Old 04-07-2007, 09:41 PM
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buy don't rent. If you don't need them changed out and you are renting then you will be paying for them when your not using them. I barely use mine at the shop either so why pay rent on them.
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  #26  
Old 04-08-2007, 12:25 PM
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Thanks for the input. Now, in terms of size, what would some suggestions be. Again, keep in mind that I'm not an everyday fabricator but wouldn't want them to empy too quickly.
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  #27  
Old 04-08-2007, 01:45 PM
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i would go with a medium size oxy bottle i think we use like a 175cu ft, and somthing smaller for the acetylene, around 100. Sorry i don't know the sizes they come in but if you call the welding shop they will give you something close (haha). Also, don't buy the cheapy harbor frieght bottles because they have a thinner wall material used in the tank and some welding shops might not change them out.
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  #28  
Old 09-11-2007, 11:59 AM
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My practice welds

I would like to show you guy's my practice welds and get some input. My first question is how do I get my pictures uploaded to this forum? I am using a lincoln 220v 175+ unit with .30 wire with the gas set at 25 psi. I am using for practice thin wall 3/4 x 1 1/2 rectangle tubing. The welds look good to me, but I just got started on welding this year and I know nothing! Thanks for all you help, Christopher
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  #29  
Old 09-11-2007, 12:03 PM
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I would like to show you guy's my practice welds and get some input. My first question is how do I get my pictures uploaded to this forum? ......Thanks for all you help, Christopher
You need to find a site to "host" your pictures. If you become a Member here on theOFN, we can host them.
http://www.offroadfabnet.com/forums/payments.php
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  #30  
Old 09-24-2007, 06:00 PM
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I have a question:

I have a car with an existing roll cage in it, but the door bars are in my way, and I'd like to cut them out and change the design/shape of them. I have the tools and knowledge to make the new ones, but I'm at a loss on the best way to remove the old ones.

What I'm planning on doing is cutting them out with a sawzall, and then taking an angle grinder to whats left, but I'm worried about weakening the metal that gets left as part of the cage...
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  #31  
Old 09-24-2007, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleeper View Post
This is all good info. I currently have a cutting/welding kit but no bottles. I've heard people tell me to just rent the bottles per project as opposed to buying a set. Any help with that. I'm not an everyday fabricator but when the time comes to need the torch I would hate to have to rely on the store to be open to rent one.
I would never rent bottle when needed. But I have rented bottles by the year. When it comes to renting and buying it really depends on. Do you move around alot. Who do you do business with, are the a regional co. or just local.

If you buy and not rent you are technically responsable for the valve and bottle (hydrotesting) every 5 years. It could get expensive if the bottles are not taken care of. If you buy a bottle you are constantly proving that it is yours. (keep your reciept). If your buy and have take the bottle to another company to fill usually they will not because it is not there bottle. If they do fill it there is usually a wait (days). If you buy and move to another location and the co is not regional you stuck with a bottle that nobody will fill.

Now, if your do business with the same comp. and do not plan on moving. Then buy one. Usually they will just take your bottle and swap it out with a full one. they do not care if it is rented or owned. They are making money on the gas not the bottles.

What happens if you buy a bottle (return it to get filled within the hydro dated period) they give you a bottle that is with in days of being out of hydro. You keep it for a month or so return it to get filled again. They try to stick you with the hydro cost. It happend to me. Just say I do not do business with them no more.

Might sound like a bunch of rampling, pretty tired right know and kids screaming I think there is a point in there somewere???
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  #32  
Old 10-21-2007, 01:23 PM
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What are the pros and cons about using a stick welder? I'm using a 220amp 110v Clarke, so far I've gotten to the point that I can lay a good strong bead. The biggest prob I've found is I have to watch were I plug it in at cause it affects my welds greatly.
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  #33  
Old 02-13-2008, 04:55 PM
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Stick Welders

I'm with ya nick, I have an old buzz box (it's a lincoln 225 AC) that my father has had for years, I have welded several of my small projects such as motor mounts, trailer sides, floor plates, and others but i am about to start building a custom buggy out of 1.75 x .120 wall HREW along with some key areas using 2 x .250 wall DOM tubing. My question is this: if I lay a good weld and insure penetration, can I use the arc welder or do I need to use a MIG or TIG? I have gotten a lot of warning from the local shops about stick welds not being "clean" enough.... ya'll got any opinions on this? I would prefer to keep the expense of this project from starvin me so I want to use what I've got when I can....
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  #34  
Old 02-14-2008, 01:25 AM
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You "can" use a stick welder, but it's not the easiest welding that thin of material. Practice with some scrap, if you feel confident in your welds and that you can consistantly NOT screw up the tube that you just spent lots of time getting bent and notched just right, then go ahead and stick it. I prefer to MIG, gives a cleaner looking weld with less cleanup and more control a lot faster and easier. But it can be done. Hell, you could use an oxy/acet setup and gas weld it if you want to. That's how they used to do cromo tube.
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  #35  
Old 02-14-2008, 01:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by russellmn View Post
You "can" use a stick welder, but it's not the easiest welding that thin of material. Practice with some scrap, if you feel confident in your welds and that you can consistantly NOT screw up the tube that you just spent lots of time getting bent and notched just right, then go ahead and stick it. I prefer to MIG, gives a cleaner looking weld with less cleanup and more control a lot faster and easier. But it can be done. Hell, you could use an oxy/acet setup and gas weld it if you want to. That's how they used to do cromo tube.
If your notches are tight then you can get away with welding .120 wall tubing with 7018 1/8" but you have to be proficient with welding stick.Ive done it and its not too difficult.Just watch your angle of aproach since tube is constantly differ angles as you go around it.
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  #36  
Old 02-14-2008, 11:36 AM
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I'm fairly proficient at stick welding... and I wouldn't try to build a buggy with a stick welder. I'm sure it "can" be done, but what a PITA it would be.

If you're building a buggy, you're going to have some $$$ into the project anyhow. Why not buy a decent 220v MIG and make your life a whole lot easier. What's a used Hobart 180amp machine cost: $300? You're going to spend more than that on wasted tube, if you're trying to stick weld a chassis and you need super tight notches -> and you're a newb fabricator.
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  #37  
Old 02-14-2008, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkizerian View Post
I have a question:

I have a car with an existing roll cage in it, but the door bars are in my way, and I'd like to cut them out and change the design/shape of them. I have the tools and knowledge to make the new ones, but I'm at a loss on the best way to remove the old ones.

What I'm planning on doing is cutting them out with a sawzall, and then taking an angle grinder to whats left, but I'm worried about weakening the metal that gets left as part of the cage...

You're plan is correct. Sawzall + grinder. Just be careful when grinding the old material off the cage, especially that last 1/8" of material. I use a 120grit pad on my die grinder to get the last little bit of material off, so when I'm done you'd never know there was something welded to the cage.
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  #38  
Old 02-14-2008, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockRig View Post
You're plan is correct. Sawzall + grinder. Just be careful when grinding the old material off the cage, especially that last 1/8" of material. I use a 120grit pad on my die grinder to get the last little bit of material off, so when I'm done you'd never know there was something welded to the cage.
X2 - Just remember this: Don't grind ANY of the tube you want to keep. ONLY grind the old tube / weld. Once you get really close you can clean it up with a surface conditioning pad (scotch brite disc) or something similar and make it disappear. Patience is your friend. ;-)

Zancat
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  #39  
Old 02-14-2008, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkizerian View Post
I have a question:

I have a car with an existing roll cage in it, but the door bars are in my way, and I'd like to cut them out and change the design/shape of them. I have the tools and knowledge to make the new ones, but I'm at a loss on the best way to remove the old ones.

What I'm planning on doing is cutting them out with a sawzall, and then taking an angle grinder to whats left, but I'm worried about weakening the metal that gets left as part of the cage...
WOW!!! what response time. It only took 5 months to answer this question.
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  #40  
Old 02-14-2008, 12:11 PM
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Lol

Whoops. I better watch the dates from now on.

Zancat
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