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  #361  
Old 11-30-2012, 02:27 PM
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Does the cheaper silver stuff or the silver tape work well too? I like the tape for convenience - not sure how it compares in price/area, but I assume it's more expensive than buying the film from a roll.

I spent some time last night poking around and I am starting to fold on your advice. It looks like they may barely fit on the firewall between the a/c and the wiper motor and I think I can come up with a reasonably clean routing for the plug wires. It would hide the dent in the firewall, get them off the valvecovers and keep them away from heat. I'm not sure if I'll go this way yet, but I picked up some allthread and additional spacers on the way to work today so I can mock it up over the weekend. Thanks for pushing me on this subject.
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  #362  
Old 12-01-2012, 04:42 PM
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iv done what your trying to do and knew it was a questionable choice when i did it. if you mount those coils that close to the headers they will burn up. i must have replaced about 3 coils with-in 6k miles. i have mounted them to the back of the head and the seemed to be fine. now i had alot of room to play with im not sure about you on haveing much room between the heads and firewall.
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  #363  
Old 12-01-2012, 04:53 PM
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sniper, thanks for putting the nail in the coffin on that idea. No honestly, I appreciate the experience. It lets me know this isn't just a "worse than the other place" situation and more a "you definitely will have problems". I don't really have room behind the heads due to the setback of the engine, but I have some other options I'm exploring.

First, here is the mockup I was referring to with the coils in front of the heads. The plate is just a piece I had laying around that I drilled for this purpose. There seems to be space on the driver's side where I could do something similar, but more to the side rather than in front of the heads. I don't really like this.



Second, here is what they look like loosely situated against the firewall. They just barely fit end to end between the evaporator case and the wiper motor.







I think that doesn't look terrible. What do you think? At least it hides the dent in the firewall.
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  #364  
Old 12-01-2012, 05:08 PM
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i like them lined up against the fire wall. you could even dress it up alittle more by building a cover with a bead rolled into made out of aluminum and it should look even better. just a idea
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  #365  
Old 12-01-2012, 05:27 PM
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I like it on the firewall, cover would really tie it together nicely.
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  #366  
Old 12-02-2012, 06:45 PM
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I vote Firewall. ;o)
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  #367  
Old 12-03-2012, 01:59 AM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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And I'll 4th that. I like both the firewall mounting and the cover Idea for the wiring.

Looking good,
Jaysin
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  #368  
Old 12-11-2012, 12:46 PM
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December is turning out to be a busy month between holiday activities and work. I've been out to the garage a lot, but not working on the car - just pulling down Christmas decorations. So I have little progress to show for the last couple weeks.

I did cut some new ignition coil spacers from some 3/8" steel tube I had laying around from a hydraulic project. In the process I reduced spacing from 1-1/2" to 1-1/4", saving 1-3/4" overall length from the coil stack. The coils are now pretty close together, but still have around 1/16" gap at their closest points. I found a piece of 3-1/2" 12 gauge (~.105in thick) steel in my remnant pile, drilled a few holes in it, and bent it in my press brake to make a crude mounting bracket.



This is where I plan to put the bracket on the firewall.



You can see above that I cut a half-moon shape out of part of the bracket to give space for my A/C & fan wiring harness to pass through. This was done with a hole saw in the mill. I don't think I need the full continuous width of this bracket. I could probably cut the middle section out and just mount the feet on either end, but the firewall in this area is dented pretty bad and it helps conceal it. I think I will keep it as a one piece bracket.

I plan to mount the bracket with some rivet nuts, but I haven't picked up the tool yet or the hardware. Things have just been too busy. Here's what it looks like held up by wire.



The problem with this design is the coils and spacers completely block access to the plate. So for fastening I have either mount the bracket first, then attach the stack of coils, or I need to add tabs to the top or sides that are accessible. I think I am going to go the first route because it will look cleaner, but this will make R&R of the coils more cumbersome. Some ideas I have for assembly:
- Slide the threaded rods (or bolts) to one side an inch or so, then thread the coils and spacers one by one onto the bracket
- Assemble the coil stack onto the threaded rod, angle the stack to insert it into one side, then slide the threaded rods back to get it into them other side.
- Notch out the four mounting holes out to the edges at roughly 45* so the pre-assembled stack can be dropped into place. The rods/bolts would not be fully captured, but R&R would be easier
- As an alternative, notch the bottom holes at 45* and the tops at 90* so the bottom is installed first, then the top of the stack tilted back.

I like the last option. What do you think?

Someone asked over PM how much firewall clearance I have with the Dougs SK-100 adapters in the 1/2" setback position. Not considering the A/C suitcase, the closest is at the back of the passenger cylinder head and there is about 1-1/4" clearance. See photo below:

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Last edited by TheBandit; 12-11-2012 at 12:54 PM.
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  #369  
Old 12-11-2012, 01:11 PM
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Can you get to where the rivnuts would be inside the cabin? If so perhaps you could press some PEM studs into the bracket and attach it with nuts on the inside?

Should look good once its all said and done.

EDIT: Any thoughts on mounting these INSIDE the cabin, and have the plug wires go through a couple of grommets, one on each side of the motor? Again I have NO CLUE what sort of space is available under the dash on one of these. Or if you want to have wires that long coming inside. Just a thought.

Dan

Last edited by juicedz4; 12-11-2012 at 01:14 PM.
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  #370  
Old 01-02-2013, 12:55 PM
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Dan - Unfortunately there isn't access behind the firewall in this area. I have lots of duct work in the way. The rivet nuts should work out well. I ended up slotting the holes so I can mount the bracket first, then drop in the coils as one package. It works well, but I'll have to post photos later.

The holidays were great this year. I had the full week of Christmas off. My son is 2 now and so much fun. Mrs. TheBandit had us running all over town doing holiday activities: light parades, snow deliveries (gotta love SoCal!), ice carvings, Santa Claus, trains, etc. Not a moment was wasted on me - spending time with my son is time well spent.

On the project side, I managed a little bit of progress. My in-laws bought me a sweet new tool for Christmas - a rivet nut gun.



I have been wanting one of these for ever but never knew much about them until I started researching them a couple weeks ago. This one is made by Marson. I got it as a kit with steel ribbed rivet nuts, Marson PN 39315 which costs about $80. It is a nicely built unit - I suppose time will tell.

Here is what one of my installed rivet nuts looks like from the backside. You can see how the body of the nut deforms and clamps down on the sheet metal. You can install these blind just about anywhere you can drill a hole.



Happy with my new found capability, I proceeded to mount a few things. First, not shown, I threw a couple rivet nuts into the firewall to mount my ignition coils. I'll have to post photos of that later because I forgot to upload them. Then, after jockeying some dusty body panels out of the rafters, I put a couple rivet nuts into the core support to mount the ECM.



My original plan was to mount the ECM on the firewall behind the driver's fender. I eventually decided against this for accessibility reasons, though I still think dropping the inner fender would provide reasonable access if I had put it there.

I am going to mount a fuse/relay box above the ECM. I'm currently leaning toward a Bussman 15303 box like this one: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/wayt.../#/133/OnePage This is a nice compact sealed unit, but I need to make sure there is enough space. It will only fit 3 mini relays which would be eaten up quickly with the fuel pump and fan controls. The factory wiring has a master power relay which I'd like to include in my harness, but will probably be external due to current considerations.

Speaking of harness, I am going to rework and/or remake the factory harness. I am planning on two main feeders, one coming into the bottom front of the engine that will run around the oil pan and a second that will come from the ECM, under the fender, and back along the firewall to feed the rear. The front line will have the cam sensor, VVT, knock sensors, crank sensor, throttle body, MAP, MAF, alternator and water temp. The rear will do oil pressure, ignition coils, and fuel injectors. I am not sure which run I'll use for the O2s and VSS - probably the rear line.

With that tentative plan and a wild hair, I spend several hours reducing my mess of wiring from this:



To this:



I started on faith by completely depinning the ECM connectors. Then I worked may way from there cutting or unwrapping harness tape, snipping a few ground junctions, and weeding the individual connector pigtails out of the harness. This was work best done in the comfort of your livingroom with some towels or paper down to catch debris, gloves to keep your fingers clean, and plenty of liquid patience (your choice of brew). It took me roughly 4 hours, though I'm sure with some cutting technique it could be done faster - I prefer to unwrap tape where possible to prevent damaging wiring insulation and this takes time.

Here is a shot of all the pigtails I think I'll need and a tub full of mostly throw-aways. The tub includes some of the fuse-to-ECM wires which I will probably reuse.



I am likely going to replace the wiring altogether for the coils, oil pressure and fuel injectors because they are way too short to route the way I want them to. I hope to reuse the connectors, but I need to get new terminals and seals, which also means a new crimper that can do the metri-pack stuff (needed that anyway really).

I have a lot of work to do before I go making this into a harness. It doesn't make sense wiring it up until most of the bits and pieces are mounted, but at least now I have an idea of what I'll need to get and I can start shopping around and collecting wiring parts & tools.

Some random things on the near term checklist:
- Finish coil mounting
- Trans dipstick
- Trans cooler lines
- Power steering lines
- Assemble suspension
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  #371  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:34 AM
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After playing around with the old dipstick tube and researching options, I decided to get a Lokar flexible tube. I spent a lot of time researching these things. You can get Chinese knockoffs of the standard/classic Lokar design for as little as $25 on eBay, but even the real Lokar units are elegedly very difficult to fill and those eBay dipsticks are questionable. I came across a Milodon flexible dipstick that advertised being larger and US made, but in the end decided on a newer design from Lockar they call "Anchor Tight". It is NOT cheap. I paid $100 for this damn dipstick and it's just a dipstick for an old tranny I will likely replace down the road anyway. BUT I have seen the classic Lokars resale for decent money and I'm sure this will retain some value if I sell it later on.

I got the "firewall mount" which was advertised to be 24" long, but turned out to be quite a bit longer. When I mocked it up on the passenger side it was so long it would have to stick through the hood or bunch up in the tranny tunnel. So I decided to swing it over the top of the transmission and mount it on the driver's side to take up length.



I made a simple bracket from 1-1/4"x1/8" mild steel which I drilled and bent in a vise to tilt the dipstick slightly forward. It attaches to two of the intake bolts. I will round it out later to eliminate the corners behind the dipstick.





There are a few things that sold me on this overglorified dip stick. First, it is bigger than the standard ones (about the same ID as the hard tube was) so it shouldn't be hard to fill. Second, it is locking. There are couplings at both the transmission and the dip stick handle that function much like quick connects for pneumatic lines. They keep the flexible tube and the dipstick locked to eachother. To remove, you pull back a colar. Finally, as you can see below, this tube actually has a nut underneath that "anchors" it to the transmission. Installing the tube requires removing the transmission pan, but once the lower coupling is installed, you can remove the flexible tube at the coupling external to the transmission. Lokar also includes a plug for this location for when the tube is out or if you were racing and had a spare tranny.



I also picked up some bits and pieces to make the spark plug wires. I'm going to wait until I have the rear harness figured out before I make these, but I had some giftcards from Christmas and went for it.



What I have above are:
- Tayler 46069 ls1 coil boots, 135deg black
- Tayler 135* plug boots
- MSD 34014 8.5mm superconductor wire (25ft)
- MSD 3508 spark plug wire crimper dies
- Harbor Freight 97420 ratcheting wire crimpers

I have made about a dozen or so sets of plug wires in the last 10 years either for myself or for friends and until now I have always stripped the wire using a razer blade and crimped using vise-mounted dies and a hammer. I knew there had to be a better way and I finally put some well spent money into these crimping/stripping dies from MSD. They sell these in their own crimper, the "Pro Crimp 2" which is actually a Palladin 8000 series ratcheting crimper. The set (die + crimper) runs around $75 while the dies alone are about $25. For $8 after coupon, I picked up some crimpers from Harbor Freight that the dies work in and seem to function pretty well for a HF tool. The dies are, IMO, a lot more important than the crimper.



Here is a practice strip & crimp. It looks a million times better than what I was doing with the vise dies (though I will also say I never had one of those fail). Funny how having the right tools is gratifying and ungratifying at the same time; you no longer have to fuss with anything, but you just spent money on something that gets used now for only a few seconds.



The cheap HF crimper is not without its shortfalls. Here is something very important to look out for:



These crimpers have a lot of side-to-side play. It's not a problem for crimping because the dies are pretty wide, but for stripping it's critical to line up the dies as you cut. This can be done just holding the dies with your fingers being careful not to get pinched. I may pony up for some better crimpers down the road, but these do work pretty well for this purpose.

I've been spending a lot of time planning and head scratching so don't expect a lot from me while I work through all the little details on this. It is great to be making progress though, however small.
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  #372  
Old 01-25-2013, 01:30 AM
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I found sediment in the transmission pan. Is this likely clutch material and how concerned should I be? I haven't pulled the filter but I suppose that's the next step to see how much of this is in the system.



I got a pair of 3" v-band assemblies from the boost depot after coming across good reviews on the yellowbullet forum. These are nickel plated mild steel flanges with stainless steel v-bands. They have a male & female half that nest nicely to keep them centered and improve the seal.





Unfortunately they rob ground clearance. With the v-band in place, the lowest point is 1-1/8" below the subframe. I'm thinking about exchanging these for 2-1/2" v-bands and placing them after a 3-to-2-1/2 reducer (which I plan to use anyway), but that would only gain about 1/4" of clearance. The collectors by themselves stick down about 1/2" from the subframe. Any thoughts on this?



Any thoughts on running the injector wires between the intake manifold and the manifold cover like shown below? The cover has about 1/4" of foam for sound deadening between it and the manifold. I was thinking I could remove some of the foam for routing wires to the back of the engine. They would be inside loom or wrap to protect them from rubbing. It would make things a lot cleaner.

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  #373  
Old 01-25-2013, 07:47 AM
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I wouldn't be concerned about what you found in the transmission pan. It looks like every transmission pan I've ever pulled to do a fluid and filter change.
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  #374  
Old 02-17-2013, 02:20 AM
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Not a lot to report, but here is a power steering hose going together. First step is cutting to length. I used an abrasive chop saw for this after wrapping with tape.



The inside of the fitting has a left-hand thread for holding the outside of the hose. With the fitting in a vise it isn't hard to thread the hose in by hand.





Then the end of the fitting can be lubed and threaded into place. It is righthand thread.





Here's how it routes.









This is XRP black braided -6 power steering hose (marked Aeroquip) with a few Earls -6 power steering hose ends. I used an 11/16-18 inverted flare adapter at the power steering box and a metric 16mm-1.5 adapter at the pump. The hose braiding is not what I was hoping for; it is fuzzy. A plain old hydraulic hose would have been fine. I called the hydraulic shop and the fittings were all about the same price, but I would have saved some coin on the hose and I could have had crimped ends. Oh well.
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  #375  
Old 02-17-2013, 02:26 AM
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Thanks for posting. I finally learned what those fitting ends were for that I got from my dad years ago....cool.

Richard
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  #376  
Old 02-17-2013, 02:35 AM
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Went to the junkyard today in search of a 940 or similar vintage Volvo and found one



Here was the loot I pulled off it. A dual speed electric fan. This has the same motor as the Taurus fan, but the mounting and shroud it comes with is simple enough you could adapt it to just about anything.



The other great thing about this an is this little relay pack. Everything you need is here and it's a simple four wire hookup (power, ground, high speed, low speed). It takes a ground signal at the high or low speed wires which is what the ECM supplies so this should be simple to integrate.



It took about 20 minutes to trim the shroud in a few places, drill a couple of holes, and mount it.











I tested it out and it seems to move a good amount of air - it feels windier in there than with my old SB mechanical fan at idle. I got turned on to this fan by this thread: http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/gener...plication.html

And here is another little tidbit - Russel 611203 EFI o-ring direct to AN hose fitting (3/8 to -6 hose). I had to special order this because no one seems to carry it yet, but Russel does have it.

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  #377  
Old 02-17-2013, 12:24 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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I was hoping you would try your hand at building a sheet metal fan shroud.

That does look like a really cool fan though, and a real easy to adapt relay controller too. I might just need to get one to control my Taurus fan.

Altogether it is looking good.

Jaysin
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  #378  
Old 02-17-2013, 02:25 PM
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I would love to build a sheet metal shroud, but I have near zero skill or tools to do it right now. I have only hand shears, no brake (save for a small press brake), no bead roller, no TIG welder and worst of all no experience. All that can be overcome - I just need to find the time and and consult the OFN for guidance.
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Old 02-24-2013, 03:13 AM
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I bought 3/8 steel tube for fuel lines and it came rolled up in about a 15" diameter coil. I walked it out into the garage floor and tweaked it by hand, but that only got it so straight. I tried rolling it between a board and a concrete floor but that didn't do much either. So I came up with this: vise jaw tube straightener







I bought 3 pairs of plastic sliding door rollers from the hardware store and some grade 8 1/4" bolts. They had metal rollers, but all of them are sized for maybe 1/4" track, so they don't fit 3/8" OD tube very well. I figured the plastic rollers would flare out some and they did. I bolted the rollers on 2.75" spacing to a foot long piece of angle iron (1" as it so happens). Then I attached that in place of my vise jaws. It worked great!

At first I wasn't sure if it was going to do much. My first pulls back and forth hardly changed the tube. The key seemed to be putting enough pressure on the rollers to yield the tube. It's not easy to pull the tube through when there's enough pressure, but it can be done and it worked great once I tightened the vise enough. I think I'll head back and buy some more rollers - I can see where that would really help. I drilled the angle for 3 more, for a total of 9 (4 one one side, 5 on the other) if I fill it out.

Now that things were "straightened out" I was able to get started on the fuel line today











Doesn't look like much yet, but took me a while to figure out how I wanted to run it and gather the fittings. The flexible line is Fragola -6 fuel line with Russel ends. It runs to a 45 degree steel JIC -6 bulkhead fitting. I welded a tab to the frame to hold it. From there is (straightened) ni-tern coated steel 3/8" hardline which will run along the driver's side under the body. It will follow the route and mounting points of the original 5/16" charcoal canister line and meet up with a Corvette filter/pressure regulator out back.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:40 AM
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Thanks for the tip on the Volvo fan. That sounds like a pretty sweet setup.

You're plumbing looks great! If you're like me, it takes forever to come up with a clean run that can be serviced easily in the future.
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