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  #1  
Old 10-17-2014, 06:28 PM
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Widebody nova concept

I'm a big fan of wide body muscle cars, especially trans-am style cars. I have been toying with "some day" (i.e. "never") ideas for my '70 Nova and decided to employ my amateur photoshop skills to visualize what I would want. Below is what I came up with.

For the front (blue car), the basic concept would be to cut and add metal on the tops of the fenders between the top outer edge and the hood to create a rounded trapezoid edge shape from the top view. That area of the fender is somewhat flat so it should be easyish to make patch pieces. I assume I would have to put a vertical cut at the center of the fender and put an extension patch in to recover overall length. I'm not really sure what other relief cuts might be needed to achieve this shape. For the fenders, I started with the photo of a blue Nova from CHP Magazine because it had a convenient angle. Here is the original image

For the rear (green car), I would like to add width to the quarter panels up high extending from the existing body line that runs along the bottom of the sail panel. To show this, I started with a photo of a green Nova from PHR magazine. Here is the original image

Anybody on here done something like this?
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Old 10-17-2014, 06:30 PM
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Here's a Nova where they did something similar reskining the fenders, but they didn't go very wide.



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Old 10-17-2014, 06:59 PM
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FRP is your friend
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Old 10-17-2014, 10:50 PM
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Is that the preferred method? I saw a buildup on Muscle Car TV where they did wide body quarter panels on a mustang. The process looked easier to execute but I am not sure about the finished product. I assume it would be bonded to the sheet metal, leaving the original quarter panel mostly intact?
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Old 10-18-2014, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Is that the preferred method? I saw a buildup on Muscle Car TV where they did wide body quarter panels on a mustang. The process looked easier to execute but I am not sure about the finished product. I assume it would be bonded to the sheet metal, leaving the original quarter panel mostly intact?
"I" would want to gain performance as my only reason for going this direction thus I would be looking to dump as much weight as I could and that would likely be easier done in FRP then in metal.
The added benefit would be selling copy's out of your molds
A Fiberglass/Kevlar outer skin with a Vacuum formed Polypropylene Inner fender should be enough lighter to make the work worth the effort.

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Old 10-18-2014, 12:33 AM
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The performance gain from wider tires and track width would still be worthwhile, I think.

I am "glued" to this episode of Musclecar TV.
http://www.powerblocktv.com/episode/...s#.VEHsDcJ0z4g
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Old 10-18-2014, 11:00 AM
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The performance gain from wider tires and track width would still be worthwhile, I think.

I am "glued" to this episode of Musclecar TV.
http://www.powerblocktv.com/episode/...s#.VEHsDcJ0z4g
I think the real trick is to carry the body lines of the car through the flair. So many flairs when they get much over 4" wide look like someone used a balloon to make a bubble...

This thing will never be fast though. . .

They used the early SBF instead of the LS

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Old 10-18-2014, 03:14 PM
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Cool stuff Bandit! Great job on the PS.

How about the way they push (forget the technical name) the bedsides out on some prerunner style trucks? Cut the inner wheelwell and jack the stock sheetmetal out, weld in a spacer?
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Old 10-19-2014, 01:19 PM
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Cool stuff Bandit! Great job on the PS.

How about the way they push (forget the technical name) the bedsides out on some prerunner style trucks? Cut the inner wheelwell and jack the stock sheetmetal out, weld in a spacer?
Easy way to do this is which I used on our old 68 Buick GS was to fit a block of wood to the inside of the wheel well (2x4) and another block of wood that has the shape of the clearance I wanted on the outside wheel opening. Then take a 'scissor' jack and crank it open in between the two wood blocks. Because the outer wheel well and the quarter panel are weaker then the inner you will push the wheel opening out. On the 68 I was able to stuff a 245-60Rx15 on a 15x8 wheel in, at a factory ride height and there was zero body work required.

In looking at the Bandit's PS again I wonder if you could use a 1970 Chevelle Rear Quarter and trim it to fit, might be something to look at.

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Old 10-20-2014, 11:39 AM
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I don't think the Chevelle quarters offer much more extension. I think they have a larger wheel opening, but I don't think they'd add width by themselves.

What do you think about the method used on the Silverado in this video? They quilted a bunch of small patch pieces along the extension area. The "finished" metal looks rough. They followed it with some kind of body filler. The end result looks good.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2AfP4dmdLI

I think the jacking/pushing out method would create some undesirable distortion of the panels and wouldn't stretch the metal in areas I'd want it stretched. I want to create a top surface that doesn't exist in the present form. I also want the bottom of the quarters to flare out to the wheels too, bringing the entire wheel opening out rather than just the top. If you look at the PS quarter panel, it looks sorta like a dually bedside.
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Last edited by TheBandit; 10-20-2014 at 11:47 AM.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
I don't think the Chevelle quarters offer much more extension. I think they have a larger wheel opening, but I don't think they'd add width by themselves.

What do you think about the method used on the Silverado in this video? They quilted a bunch of small patch pieces along the extension area. The "finished" metal looks rough. They followed it with some kind of body filler. The end result looks good.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2AfP4dmdLI

I think the jacking/pushing out method would create some undesirable distortion of the panels and wouldn't stretch the metal in areas I'd want it stretched. I want to create a top surface that doesn't exist in the present form. I also want the bottom of the quarters to flare out to the wheels too, bringing the entire wheel opening out rather than just the top. If you look at the PS quarter panel, it looks sorta like a dually bedside.
I'll not knock what they did, it did turn out in the end; of this and the Mustang approach I would choose the Mustang way hands down.
Too bad the Mustang disappeared that was an intrusting build, would have liked to see it completed.

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Old 10-23-2014, 03:07 PM
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I am pretty convinced at this point that the fiberglass method is the way to go. I do wonder about using clay instead of foam since I think it would turn out a lot smoother off the mold and might be easier to correct shaping mistakes or change the design midstream.

Here is an interesting video. This person uses potters clay:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHdJ...k3hVv20c9j3_Fu

I could see myself slapping a bunch of clay on the side of my car and going to town, then the tears as it sluffs off under its own weight.
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Last edited by TheBandit; 10-23-2014 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 10-23-2014, 03:27 PM
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Where is redliner when I need him?
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