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General Fabrication Any Fab that does not fit into another Forum

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  #1  
Old 08-30-2010, 06:11 PM
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Wheels4 Wheels4 is offline
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want without the skill...

I've been trying to learn how to fabricate for about a year and a half now... and i've gotten decent at it. far from where i want to be though. I've been wanting to build a dual sport buggy for a long time.. just don't think i have the skills for it. I think I could do it... but, I would hate to waste a bunch of money just to get the frame built and realize it looks like sh*t and throw it away.

so, my question is... what are some projects you've started and then realized you didn't have the skill for? and what did you do at that point?

i know some of you can't remember that far back... so, you might have to think awhile.
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2010, 06:36 PM
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patooyee patooyee is offline
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I've never started and not finished a project. You have to go into, and continue all the way through, with the mentality that you are going to get it done no matter what, come hell or high water. You will make mistakes along the way and want to redo things afterwards that you think you can do better. That's what its all about.

Think where we as a human race would be if we never started anything for fear of failing.

I find this to be true of life in general. Dive in head first and don't quite until the job is done and you will accomplish amazing things. I constantly surprise myself with what I can do just by sheer determination.

J. J.
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  #3  
Old 08-30-2010, 08:22 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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See the quote in my signature.

If you are the type of person that is willing to learn and indeed wants to learn you can do just about anything that you set your mind to. There have been many things in my life that I didn't know how to do but I didn't let that stop me, I learned as I went and asked questions of people that had a knowledge of what I was doing and I got it done. Sure there are times that things could have been done better and on many occasions I have gone back and done them again to make them better.

J.J. is totally right, dive in and don't give up until you've figured it out.

A word of caution though. If you get to something that you don't know how to do, don't just hack your way through it, go try to find some information (ask, read, watch, learn) and then do it right. The difference between "well done" and "scary trash" is that the builder went to the trouble to learn about what he/she was doing and didn't just hack their way through. No offense to those rednecks out there, but I see plenty of redneck engineering on vehicles that I wouldn't drive around the yard let alone put on the road or trail.

So go out and learn and get your hands dirty and build it. And remember "Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, your right."

Jaysin
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:36 PM
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shaggy10000 shaggy10000 is offline
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I have to agree with both posts above. I have never given up on a project. Here's a story. Years ago when i was 19, living on my own and knew it all, I found a 63 ford stepside P/U for 200 bucks. I really wanted that truck and i really wanted it to be a 4X4. (It was a 2wd hotrod thing). I bought it with little fabrication or welding skills. I bought a welder and got some advise from someone on welding and read my ass off on the internet. Took me six months, but i added a front axle t-case, changed the motor, even made my own drivelines. I wheeled that truck for over 3 years and eventually sold it to buy something that would go more places.
I ended up with the samurai that i still have. I put a v-6 and an automatic, changed axles and t-case to match. Drove it for 5 years and decided to change everything again. In that time i worked on a lot of other vehicles and did a ton of fabrication and welding on other rigs. learned a ton along the way. When i was changing things i couldnt believe some of the stuff i did the first go round. It was embarassing to say the least. I've come a long way but it took a long time.
The more you do it the better you get. Its just metal. You can change it anytime.
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:49 PM
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Wheels4 Wheels4 is offline
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thanks for the input fellas... i appreciate it. and i can tell you.. i am the type to research the crap out of something and then try it. once i try it... i learn and learn until i can do it pretty good. I've gotten a lot of compliments on my cage and trailer(both built from scratch)... but, i have to also take that with a grain of salt b/c i don't know if people are blowing smoke or just trying to be nice. I'm proud of them either way. anyways... i truly believe i can do it. just need to break down and do it.

thanks again for the input...
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Old 08-31-2010, 05:07 AM
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rbeckett rbeckett is offline
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Wheels, Heres a thought for you to consider. If you never buy the ticket, you will never win the lottery.... Life is about taking on a new challenge and beating the odds. If you dont try you have failed. Just start slow, and buy materials as you really need them and that will keep your out of pocket decent till you get to a point that it is time to drop some cash to finish it up. Like the others said, learn, read, study and DO. You will be OK, and as most folks know we are our own worse critic. If you pay attention to that little voice in your head that says that looks like crap and fix that your project will be safe and sound in the end. Good luck, and FWIW I never let the wheel chair I ended up in stop anything I do, it slows me down but I will get it done, just a little later than I planned...
Bob
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  #7  
Old 08-31-2010, 08:37 AM
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robs88yj robs88yj is offline
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I always look at every project as a chance to learn something new. I will spend dollars on tech manuals to help me get through a project. My next learning challange will be rebuilding the tranny in my Jeep (auto). I've done a few bulldozer/front end loader trannies in the past, never an automotive type. I figure with some attention to detail, clean workspace and some photographic documentation I should be just fine. I look back at how my Jeep has progressed over the years and am amazed at the changes in it and my skills. http://www.texasoffroad.net/galleries/ohv/album161
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Old 08-31-2010, 11:10 AM
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entropy entropy is offline
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All of the above, AND it is also perfectly ok to learn, after starting, that you don't want to do something!
I once learned after I started, bought tools, and parts, I don't do Automatic Transmissions, well IF I can avoid it!
I know a couple people that thought Fabrication looked like fun, and learned it is hard work, that they hated it and that is fine.
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  #9  
Old 08-31-2010, 11:14 AM
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Wheels4 Wheels4 is offline
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wow, I asked a simple question and got some quality replies. Thank you guys. I believe I am going to give it a try...

I have to fix my rhino first. then comes the buggy.


entropy... Fabrication is definitely hard work. I've learned a lot... but, the most valuable lesson i've learned is that I hate fabricating for others. I love doing it for myself though. probably a bad thing... but, i'm being honest and it probably has to do with money.


edit: hate is a strong word... I just don't enjoy it near as much.

Last edited by Wheels4; 08-31-2010 at 11:23 AM.
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  #10  
Old 08-31-2010, 02:35 PM
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JaysinSpaceman JaysinSpaceman is offline
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One more thing, and I bet it applies to all of us that fab on a regular basis.

You will make mistakes!

But, do not waste that mistake. Learn from it, figure out where you went wrong and what you should do different and then don't make that same mistake again. Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me.

Jaysin
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  #11  
Old 08-31-2010, 05:52 PM
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METAL TWISTER METAL TWISTER is offline
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In hind sight... I think if I were to do it again Id buy a running vehicle close to what I want and then modify it to your liking. That way you pick your battles while your skills improve. Once all the skills are mastered. LOL then build one from scratch while you have one to drive during the process.

So many get started and after a while they loose interest because of $$$, time, lack of tools, knowledge, etc. Buy one of those projects and finish it. But there is now better way to learn than dive in and start swimming.
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  #12  
Old 08-31-2010, 05:56 PM
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Wheels4 Wheels4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by METAL TWISTER View Post
In hind sight... I think if I were to do it again Id buy a running vehicle close to what I want and then modify it to your liking. That way you pick your battles while your skills improve. Once all the skills are mastered. LOL then build one from scratch while you have one to drive during the process.

So many get started and after a while just loose interest because of $$$, time, lack of tools, knowledge, etc. Buy one of those projects and finish it.
I've also considered doing that.. buying another rhino and turning it into a mini crawler. i've got a lot of ideas that i would really like to try while keeping my current ride available to ride.

i've read many threads on various forums about people losing interest b/c of the same reasons you list.
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