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  #21  
Old 06-12-2014, 10:51 AM
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Skid plate tray solves many of these issues
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  #22  
Old 06-18-2014, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by RogueFab View Post
Skid plate tray solves many of these issues
Yea... I have been swayed to that side of the design route for sure.


Started screwing around with the replacement rear over axle cross member. The previous owner had a piece of 4" C-channel end welded inside of the frame rails with two bolts with the heads welded to the C-channel and that was the cross member and shock mounts... Can it be seen from anywhere other than under the truck when the body is on?... no... However, I'm still going to build something that looks a little better than a piece of C-channel.

Slots are for the shock tabs / tank and skid supports to slide into. Whole thing is built out of 1/8". The design is rather torsionally rigid, which it needs to be given the way I am loading the shock mounts.





Working on getting the bottom plate installed and then will mount it through the frame with 3 bolts each side through the end plate.
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  #23  
Old 07-24-2014, 04:43 PM
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Was going to use SS... decided on Aluminum instead. SS was just too much of an extra pain in the ass to work with given the thickness of material I had, the machineability of it and the overall weldability of it. 1/8" 5052 Aluminum plate. I felt adventuresome and built my own little bolt in sump.. Why, because I felt like machining something. I still need to drill and tap it for the outlet and I am going to put a drain of sorts in the bottom. Its a small sump but should still help some incase I get the truck in a weird hill climb scenario... never know as I plan on taking it camping in a few of the State Forests and such around here when its done.








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  #24  
Old 07-24-2014, 04:44 PM
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This part has me bafflingly baffled....

Should help keep the "slosh" down in the tank. This is my first real Aluminum Welding project of any real caliber... you've been warned. :homer:



Fuel return manifold. The fuel system on this thing requires 3 different return lines because I can't source the factory fuel pressure regulator... so...

I had to build this BS contraption to handle the 3 different pressures of fuel coming back to the tank.

Started with 3" round stock.



Some screwing around yielded this...



One -08 and two -06 returns at JIC 37 degree.



Aluminum submergence tubes connecting to bottom of manifold with 45 degree flare connections.




And end result.



Should reduce air entrainment of the fuel which will prevent foaming which often creates weeping out of the vent yielding in fuel smell that won't go away, and will also help with performance of the engine and increase the life of the injectors.
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  #25  
Old 07-24-2014, 04:45 PM
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More on the fuel system.

Probably not needed but I snagged it anyways. Fuel sump test setup that is used on aircraft. Easy enough to install in my system now rather than later.






Roll over vent at furthest point from filler inlet.



And fuel temp sensor came in from Cummins. Since my stock filter assembly is missing where it would normally mount I am making an adapter that picks up the fuel temp off the back side of the ECM. Still waiting on my M14-1.5 to 1/2 NPT adapter fitting.



More fuel tank stuff.



Return manifold.









And started routing my fuel hoses.

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  #26  
Old 07-24-2014, 04:49 PM
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Nice work!
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  #27  
Old 07-24-2014, 05:17 PM
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BRAVO! That tank is a work of art.
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  #28  
Old 07-25-2014, 06:32 AM
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very nice
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  #29  
Old 07-25-2014, 07:11 AM
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Really, really nice work here! I like the machine work on the sump and the return manifold. Don't worry about the welding too much. 1/8" 5052 is one of the easiest material/thickness combinations to learn on. Just tack often because it will want to move around on you.

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  #30  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
Really, really nice work here! I like the machine work on the sump and the return manifold. Don't worry about the welding too much. 1/8" 5052 is one of the easiest material/thickness combinations to learn on. Just tack often because it will want to move around on you.

Thanks!

The blippy bad looking spots are where my tacks were a little too big relative to my final weld bead size but overall it did in fact go pretty well.




Temp sensor adapter for the fuel system details worked out. Connects to bottom of ECM fuel cooler outlet.





And now I am trying to clean up the wiring harness from the donor truck. 89 pin engine connector and then the Allison has two 36 pin connectors and a 20 pin. SO. Many. Sensors...



However you can see on the floor here how much I have pulled out from the old truck. It had turn signal and running lights, etc all blended into the front chassis harness (bread van) so getting that stuff out of the way has been quite helpful in managing the actual engine transmission stuff.

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  #31  
Old 08-03-2014, 08:19 AM
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Pressure tested my tank and only found one leak. Pleased with that for sure!



Is your 1942 Truck fly-by-wire? Why not? All the cool kids are doing it! :flipoff2:



Also started on my rear shock mounts. The tabs go all the way through the cross member and act as web stiffeners and will have bushing shells welded on the back that will be part of my fuel tank supports for the tank skid.

Found a set of "Era-esque" looking bell body shocks. Well, '50s style at the least as they are almost identical visually to what was on my M37... and these are air assist if I feel so inclined to use that function. Depends on how soft the spring packs end up being when I get them built.

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  #32  
Old 08-14-2014, 10:33 AM
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Lets talk a little tech real quick. I am working out the design for the ani-wrap bar and its mounting point on the frame. The wheelbase on this truck is only ~118” but on 38”s she sits pretty tall and the CG of the engine is up there too. Anyways, I want to shoot for between 75% and 100% anti-squat for the rear suspension and I know that the anti-wrap bars, if laid out wrong, can really mess with squat and anti-squat. Its not a wheeling rig but there will be times when I am going to stand on the throttle either pulling a trailer or from a stop light, etc. I am going to have softer custom leafs made for the rear and since the springs are only 1-3/4” wide, fairly long, and will be spring over, I want to minimize any wrap for sake of driveabilty and spring life.

So, the numbers side of things or design concept. The traction bar I am building is essentially a radius arm with a shackle on the frame end. Long and flat seems to be the best. I used the 4 link calculator to layout the current wheelbase and CG, etc. Since the purpose of the anti-wrap bar is to isolate axle torsion, I am trying to figure out if omitting the front spring mount location is a viable method of analysis. The springs do locate the axle and will absorb some wrap, but its in a dynamic manner and is in fact the loading that I am trying to control. By design, the anti-wrap bar should take the load of the axle wrap before the springs can, (realistically after tolerance and bushing deflection) thus leaving the springs to function just as a spring and a trailing arm type locating device.

Am I thinking about this correctly? If so I have a good design that’s giving me about 85% AS for the rear suspension. The bar is going to be fabricated from plates and angles to give kind of a vintage / aircraft look.
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  #33  
Old 08-14-2014, 11:46 AM
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A normal four link calculator is not going to work right for a shackled anti-wrap bar. The reason being your springs are doing the longitudinal location of the axle. The anti-wrap bar only reacts axle torque.

The amount of anti-squat you can generate with a torque arm (anti-wrap bar) in this configuration is limited because it applies a vertical force equal to (axle torque) / (arm length), and no longitudinal force. If the end of the torque arm is directly under the CG, it produces effectively zero anti-squat because there is no pitch moment about the CG, though it is trying to lift the whole vehicle.

The thing you have to be careful of with a torque arm is making them too short. The vertical load applied to the chassis is equal and opposite on the axle. This is great for acceleration, because it's lifting the chassis and applying a downward force to the axle. In braking, the situation reverses, and can lead to brake hop.

I would make your arm somewhere in the ballpark of 4-5 feet long, something that will package into your chassis conveniently, and not get too worried about the conventional definition of anti-squat because it's not really applicable to this suspension system.
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  #34  
Old 08-14-2014, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
A normal four link calculator is not going to work right for a shackled anti-wrap bar. The reason being your springs are doing the longitudinal location of the axle. The anti-wrap bar only reacts axle torque.

The amount of anti-squat you can generate with a torque arm (anti-wrap bar) in this configuration is limited because it applies a vertical force equal to (axle torque) / (arm length), and no longitudinal force. If the end of the torque arm is directly under the CG, it produces effectively zero anti-squat because there is no pitch moment about the CG, though it is trying to lift the whole vehicle.

The thing you have to be careful of with a torque arm is making them too short. The vertical load applied to the chassis is equal and opposite on the axle. This is great for acceleration, because it's lifting the chassis and applying a downward force to the axle. In braking, the situation reverses, and can lead to brake hop.

I would make your arm somewhere in the ballpark of 4-5 feet long, something that will package into your chassis conveniently, and not get too worried about the conventional definition of anti-squat because it's not really applicable to this suspension system.
Thanks.

And I am just using the 4 link calc to approximate my instant center so that I can find that "sweet spot" below the CG and then hand run my numbers from there. I came up with 58" at 21" above the ground (tires are 38"s) so your number from the hip / experience is spot on with what I am pulling out on paper. Saweet. Thanks for giving some tech backing on this. No off to fabrimicate something.
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  #35  
Old 08-17-2014, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Strongly suggest 18 gauge or thicker. Welding 20gauge or thinner is going to SUCK.

Here's a cool article I came across a while back on fabbing a tank. Perhaps you'll find it useful: http://www.streetrodderweb.com/tech/...stom_gas_tank/

the filler cap is the bomb!! just what I have been looking for,thanks
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  #36  
Old 08-18-2014, 08:14 AM
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Rebuilt the 205... and another that is going in a friend's Mega-Truck (Think Dennis Anderson's King-Sling".







Continued with exhaust work while the body is still off. Hoping to get that back on the truck here soon.






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  #37  
Old 08-26-2014, 06:24 AM
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Well, body back on. Time to do some firewall and floorboard work.










And before anyone gets all mad about Engine angle.. don't get your panties in a bunch, its under control.
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  #38  
Old 08-26-2014, 02:59 PM
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Why did you have it on the flatbed? I recently moved my Nova that way. Called AAA because for some reason it just wouldn't start mid-engine swap (gosh darn it). They sent a flatbed and took it to my new house.
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  #39  
Old 08-26-2014, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Why did you have it on the flatbed?
A friend of mine has a nice post lift and the rollback to haul the chassis from my place to his and then back again. I have had friends send their trail rigs to and from my shop via AAA when I did cage work on a few of them.
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  #40  
Old 10-05-2014, 09:37 PM
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Building an anti-wrap bar.. yes I know its overkill. Oh well. You didn't have to put it together.

Its all 1/8".... 1/8" plate, 1/8" angle. 10-24" button heads and tri-point top lock nuts (1/8" allen wrench even). I didn't order quite enough of the 1/2" bolts so I am going to order a few more of those. The axle end will get bushings in shells that will have flanges welded to them and then the flanges will bolt to the web plates. The front shackle is one I salvaged from the leaf springs of a 1/2 ton WC. Its got the mil-spec look and such. Have to re-bronze sleeve it yet and will have some bolt in pin slugs for it too.

Pictures.















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