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In The Shop Shop talk, shop tools & fixtures, shop wear, anything for the shop that is not covered in another forum.

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  #1  
Old 10-07-2016, 11:16 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Horizontal Bandsaw Rebuild

I recently picked up a new-to-me horizontal bandsaw off Craigslist...I would've kept on scrolling but there was a picture of the tag that showed it was a Johnson Model B, which is a good little saw for a small shop. It appeared to be mostly all there, and the price was right ($20!) so I hauled home possibly the ugliest known example of one of these saws:



This is a 5" x 10" saw and it weighs approximately 200 lbs, definitely a sturdy piece. Much better than what I've been using, for sure.

I disassembled it and ran everything through the parts washer, then everything that would fit went through the blast cabinet before getting painted in Rustoleum gray.

The one piece that wouldn't fit in the blast cabinet was the main frame, so it got the aircraft stripper treatment before repainting...



Mostly back together:



In this photo it was still missing the idler wheel and blade. I replaced the bearings with new ones and it took two attempts to get the right parts shipped to me. The only things I didn't completely disassemble were the gearbox and the idler wheel carriage. The saw was covered in grease so I assumed initially the gearbox was leaking...which it may have been due to a completely plugged breather. But I also think it may have been tipped over or someone was really sloppy with filling it because it doesn't appear to leak after running the saw.

I replaced all the guide bearings as well. Pretty much all of them were junk. Fortunately all the castings are intact and there weren't any surprises after taking the saw apart. The only parts that are missing are the hydraulic downfeed cylinder and a weight to adjust cutting pressure. I made a new weight from a chunk of round bar I had laying around, and after running the saw a little bit, I'm not sure the downfeed cylinder is required.

Due to it's weight, it isn't practical to move it around without wheels. Plus, I wanted to raise it a bit to get to a more convenient working height, so I made a mobile base.

Here it is before adding some plate for the casters. This is all 1" square by 14 gauge tubing. I was able to use up some test bends to make up mounting pads for the saw's feet.



A closeup of that detail. This eventually got a 13/32" hole for a 3/8" bolt to secure the feet to the base.



With caster plates added. This is some leftover 1/4" x 6" HR flat with drilled/tapped holes for the casters.



Saw on the base:



After adjusting everything and installing a new blade, this thing cuts arrow-straight! It appears to have been a good investment of my time and about $150 to restore it.

I still have to make new sheet metal pieces so the blade and drive belt are appropriately guarded. The old stuff is so rough it will be faster and easier to just make new parts. I also need to finish restoring the tags and reattach them to the saw frame.

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  #2  
Old 10-07-2016, 03:01 PM
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TheBandit TheBandit is offline
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That is freakin' cool. You easily added 10-15x value over what you paid for that thing. I really like the use of the bends to make landing pads for the original frame. That thing is going to be a workhorse.
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  #3  
Old 10-07-2016, 03:03 PM
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R.DesJardin R.DesJardin is offline
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Super nice and an awesome deal. So why not mount the On-Off switch up on the saw frame so you don't have to bend over to turn it on. I hate bending over when running the saw. I added air cylinders to mine to lift the saw and hold it up while I move of insert material. Its nice to just flip a switch to raise the saw. Lazy or ingenious, not sure which, maybe just a little insane.
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Old 10-07-2016, 03:34 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
That is freakin' cool. You easily added 10-15x value over what you paid for that thing. I really like the use of the bends to make landing pads for the original frame. That thing is going to be a workhorse.
Thanks! My wife thinks I'm nuts sometimes but I generally do OK on stuff like this. I'm not affording a new Ellis anytime soon so I have to be creative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by R.DesJardin View Post
Super nice and an awesome deal. So why not mount the On-Off switch up on the saw frame so you don't have to bend over to turn it on. I hate bending over when running the saw. I added air cylinders to mine to lift the saw and hold it up while I move of insert material. Its nice to just flip a switch to raise the saw. Lazy or ingenious, not sure which, maybe just a little insane.
I tried (not super hard) to fit the switch in somewhere to make it auto shutoff, but it didn't work out. Originally there was a linkage to a switch under the saw that was missing. Seems like they were problematic because my dad has a J saw that was set up similarly that is also missing the linkage.

I would like to see your air cylinder setup. I'm thinking about putting on one with a needle valve to control the down feed, but it's about $100 in parts to make it all work.
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:35 PM
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R.DesJardin R.DesJardin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
...
I would like to see your air cylinder setup. I'm thinking about putting on one with a needle valve to control the down feed, but it's about $100 in parts to make it all work.
So you're saying you've never looked at any of my posts about my saws.
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  #6  
Old 10-07-2016, 05:10 PM
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Adam Gardiner Adam Gardiner is offline
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Very nice work there
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  #7  
Old 10-10-2016, 08:41 AM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R.DesJardin View Post
So you're saying you've never looked at any of my posts about my saws.
I had to go back and refresh my memory!

Your auto-up with the solenoid is cool! I don't know if I'm ready to go there quite yet, but the biggest reason I wanted to add a downfeed cylinder is to do exactly what you did with the ball valve to hold the frame up while setting up a cut.

My saw also has provisions for a stop for repeat cuts, most of which was missing when I got it, but it doesn't look that hard to make one. Someday I'll get to that...
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Old 10-10-2016, 05:44 PM
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CarterKraft CarterKraft is offline
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The landing pad detail is awesome.

I would definitely incorporate a auto stop. I have some limit switches I can donate.
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Old 10-10-2016, 11:02 PM
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Bray D Bray D is offline
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Super cool. Awesome work. I envy guys that can bring things back to life like that. I typically end up spending more money restoring things than I would have if I would've just bought new. Well done.
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Old 10-10-2016, 11:13 PM
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deaner deaner is offline
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Looks great. Can you mount the switch on a plate, up 4" and away from the motor 4", then put a tab on the main frame just below the handle that bumps the switch off when it's down?
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  #11  
Old 10-11-2016, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bray D View Post
Super cool. Awesome work. I envy guys that can bring things back to life like that. I typically end up spending more money restoring things than I would have if I would've just bought new. Well done.
Thanks!

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Originally Posted by deaner View Post
Looks great. Can you mount the switch on a plate, up 4" and away from the motor 4", then put a tab on the main frame just below the handle that bumps the switch off when it's down?
I was looking at doing pretty much exactly what you're talking about, but the base of the saw isn't really set back far enough from the frame to do this...the frame would contact the box, not the switch itself. For now, I just used some existing holes in the leg and will come back to it later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarterKraft View Post
The landing pad detail is awesome.

I would definitely incorporate a auto stop. I have some limit switches I can donate.
Really? That would be awesome! I'm assuming I would have to include a relay and a push button switch to start the saw to make it work with a momentary limit switch. Is that right? My lathe is somewhat like that, but it's been quite a while since I've looked at the wiring in detail.
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Old 10-11-2016, 05:35 PM
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Small update...got the tags restored and back on the saw. They were pretty rough to start with, so they aren't perfect by any stretch. I ran them through the blast cabinet to get the worst off, then sanded the raised areas with 400 grit and used black 1-Shot sign enamel to do the background. I got some new drive screws from McMaster-Carr to re-secure them to the saw frame.





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  #13  
Old 10-11-2016, 08:00 PM
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Like new again!
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Old 10-11-2016, 10:23 PM
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bullnerd bullnerd is offline
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At first I was thinking this was a cheap saw , but I think I was thinking of the Carolina brand?

Looks great. nice job.
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  #15  
Old 10-17-2016, 01:42 PM
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CarterKraft CarterKraft is offline
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Let me dig the switches out the box and Ill let you pick.

I was thinking the system like the 4x6 and 7x10 saws use but then you wouldn't need the limit switch...
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Old 10-17-2016, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarterKraft View Post
Let me dig the switches out the box and Ill let you pick.

I was thinking the system like the 4x6 and 7x10 saws use but then you wouldn't need the limit switch...
I appreciate it, but don't go to a ton of trouble. I think the easiest way to do this is just to recreate the linkage under the saw. I have the original switch and it continuity checks OK...just need to make up a couple more pieces. I back-burnered it so I could get the saw working and get another paying project finished.
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Old 10-17-2016, 06:37 PM
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CarterKraft CarterKraft is offline
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No sweat, you might be able to use one (i'd be stoked if you could).
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  #18  
Old 11-21-2016, 05:15 PM
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Not a whole lot to report, but I have managed to find time to recreate the original sheet metal with new tin:



I still need to finish smoothing it up and rounding off some sharp corners before it gets painted. The one thing I changed from the original is using self-ejecting butterfly Dzus fasteners to hold things together instead of the cheesy latches that were on it originally.
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:42 PM
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Better than new! What method did you use for the large radius bends? Did you just form it by hand and tack as you went or ?
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Old 11-22-2016, 04:32 PM
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Thanks! Actually, I had a short piece of 4" exhaust pipe that I used to bend it around. I just held the pipe down on top of the sheet metal and made a few small bends to form the radius. I had already made the rest of the bends, so that helped control things quite a bit. That got me really close, then I tacked the corners in to finish holding things in place.
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