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Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.


Race Car Fabrication There is a lot of cool fabriaction going on the race car industry, show us what you got.

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  #21  
Old 10-30-2013, 01:00 PM
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Graham08 Graham08 is offline
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A few more pictures...

Here's one of the engine installation. My thought on this is since I'm carrying the weight of the engine around, I should try to make it do something structural. Plus, the large motor plates stiffen a part of the chassis that's hard to triangulate.



The compromise here is the lower left corner had to be cut out for oil pump/line clearance. Everything else is tied in well, so I don't think I'm losing too much stiffness.

Here's another shot of the rear motor plate and driveline. The hole in the motor plate above the torque ball housing is going to be used to drive the fuel pump off the back of the camshaft.



Here's another bright idea that didn't turn out so well...



The original plan was to make a seat pan like a funny car or dragster and use a foam insert to fit the driver, which would have been supported by the tubing in this picture. I ended up changing this to fit a Butlerbuilt seat with full head/shoulder containment. It just is a simpler and better solution to keeping the driver safe...which has required some other changes. More on that later.

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  #22  
Old 10-31-2013, 10:01 AM
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Racerx1194 Racerx1194 is offline
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This build is great

Love this build could be because i race a dirt sprint but i still love it
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  #23  
Old 10-31-2013, 10:52 AM
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Love this build also, but that will never work. There's no flywheel/starter/transmission....LOL. All kidding aside, does the QC rearend have "in-out" to replace the in-out box?
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  #24  
Old 10-31-2013, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Racerx1194 View Post
Love this build could be because i race a dirt sprint but i still love it
Thanks! Where do you race at? I help a friend of mine with his dirt car...actually if I was starting a new project today it would probably be a non-wing dirt car.

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Love this build also, but that will never work. There's no flywheel/starter/transmission....LOL. All kidding aside, does the QC rearend have "in-out" to replace the in-out box?
Yes, it's a shifter rear end. There's a shift fork that engages a pair of dog rings in the lower shaft. There will be a push-pull cable up to the cockpit to put it in or take it out of gear.
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  #25  
Old 10-31-2013, 03:13 PM
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Non wing here Kansas city grain valley race track plan on running with the W.A.R series next year i Race a 08 J @ J but have been looking for a non wing car
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  #26  
Old 11-08-2013, 07:39 PM
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Engine plates for chassis stiffness huh? Sound familiar.

Im excited for this project.
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  #27  
Old 11-11-2013, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Racerx1194 View Post
Non wing here Kansas city grain valley race track plan on running with the W.A.R series next year i Race a 08 J @ J but have been looking for a non wing car
Cool. I really like non-wing racing. Racing without the wing turns it into a contest between drivers and setups rather than sheer horsepower.

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Originally Posted by nwmod39 View Post
Engine plates for chassis stiffness huh? Sound familiar.

Im excited for this project.
Thanks! I am, too...I have been ignoring this thing for way too long.

Once I got the car to the point in the last bunch of photos, it sat. And sat. And sat. I completely rebuilt two supermodifieds, moved, and built a new shop while it was sitting.

One thing I was able to do before I got moved into the new shop was take some time to build the steering column support and shafts.



The parts that I didn't build all came from Woodward. This includes the quick release for the wheel and the U-joints. They really build some nice stuff.

Here's a closer view with the wheel removed.



The column is a piece of tubing with a pair of flanged bearings pressed into it. The steering shafts are made using 3/4" x 0.120" tubing, with splined inserts that are available from Woodward. These are a lot better than welding the U-joints to the shafts, and allow the whole thing to come apart easily.

Here is an overall view of the shaft routing, with the column mocked up.



This ends up getting changed a bit later on, but the overall routing (through the injection, over the mag) stays the same. The telescoping lower steering shaft is also a Woodward piece. It's actually a collapsible intermediate shaft, which has a full 8" of stroke.

This is the first iteration of the forward shaft support. I really like this part, but I wound up having to change it also when I upgraded the rack.



And finally, a top view of the steering shaft going over the engine.



Once I got to this point, it was time to work on the new shop again, so the car sat for another while. One think I learned when I got to this point was the original rack (from Latest Rage) wasn't going to cut it. You could really feel the slop in the rack at the wheel. Aside from that, I think the manual steering setup it going to work...effort when the car is sitting still (which is usually the worst part) isn't bad.
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  #28  
Old 11-14-2013, 01:49 PM
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OK, fast forward another year...almost caught up to the present.

I was able to get my hands on a new Woodward rack to replace what I had bought originally. There is no comparison between the two. The housing on the Woodward unit is magnesium, and the rack rides in honed bronze bushings. The pinion is supported by three ball bearings, and there is a provision to adjust out backlash. All in all, a really nice piece.

But, the mounting is completely different than what I had. It mounts on a flat plate using three 1/2" bolts. I made a boxed mount out of 0.090" 4130 sheet, with bungs for the mounting bolts.



This is area where hanging out on this site and a few others have had a big influence on how I build things. I love the fabricated sheet metal pieces that ZTFab and others build for desert cars. They're light, stiff, and strong all at the same time.

Here it is after welding to the axle.



And in the car with the rack bolted up.



The rack upgrade meant I needed to make a minor change in the routing of the steering shaft. While I was at it, I added a joint to get better clearance over the magneto. This meant I had to support the shaft a little differently, so I made up this piece that runs parallel to the steering shaft through the injection.



Here's a front view:



Hopefully this is the last time I mess with the steering setup. I'm in the process of making aluminum steering arms now, so the wheels will be steerable again.
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  #29  
Old 11-14-2013, 06:56 PM
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Is the steering shaft collapsable at some point so that it doesn't get shoved into the driver in an accident?
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  #30  
Old 11-14-2013, 07:31 PM
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Yes, the first section (at the axle) has 8"of travel. Its partially collapsed at static ride height to allow for droop travel, but it would collapse several inches in a crash. There is also a special shaft collar at the bottom of the steering column that I got from Woodward that prevents the shaft from getting pushed back. It's serrated on the inside to really bite into the shaft.
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  #31  
Old 11-15-2013, 02:37 PM
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Something else I wanted to address on the front axle was the adjustability of the Panhard rod mount. The original piece was not adjustable on the left side. Something I've learned in the time since I've built that is the roll center height on these cars is a pretty big deal, and if it's easily adjustable, it gives you another tool to adjust the balance.

I was given some pieces and parts a couple years ago that would be used to build NASCAR truck arms. Among those were adjustable lower shock mounts that have serrations on a 1/8" pitch. While I don't anticipate making 1/8" changes in front roll center height, it's cool to have the ability.

I cut the mounting lug off of this mount, and made this bracket around it:



This is more 0.090" 4130 sheet. The serrated part is 1/2" thick, so I made a pocket around it so it could be welded to the front and rear of this bracket. In the future, I may wind up machining the whole thing myself out of one piece.

Here it is attached to the axle:



I made a monster hole saw arbor out of 1-3/8" bar stock to be able to notch along the 6" or so width of the bracket in the milling machine. It turned out well, even though I had to keep stopping when I bottomed out the hole saw to cut part of the material away with a hacksaw in order to keep notching. I think making the arbor was quicker than fitting this by hand would have been.

I made the mating serrated piece and a backing washer to complete the project. Cutting the serrations was pretty simple...I just tilted the head of the milling machine 45 degrees and used an end mill.

The only thing I'm not crazy about is that it puts the bolt in single shear, but it's still overkill for the application. The only time I would have to worry about yielding the bolt is if the front end smacks the fence.
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  #32  
Old 11-20-2013, 09:47 AM
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I'm continuing to work on the front end, making brake parts and steering arms to complete the package up there.

Several years ago, I got set up with a little bit of a deal on Performance Friction pads and rotors. The rotors are beautifully machined, but the problem at the time was the bolt pattern for the rotor-to-hat bolts is different than "standard" sprint car parts. The rotors are an 8 bolt on 7" pattern, with through holes, while most sprint car stuff uses an 8 bolt on 7-5/8" pattern, with the holes in the rotors being tapped 5/16"-24.

I really wanted to use these rotors on this car, and looked at making hats from scratch, but I found I could by semi-finished hats from Wilwood for not a lot more than I would have in the material to make them from scratch. Wilwood offers several different offset hats with the 8 on 7" pattern in them, with a center hole. It's up to the end user to drill them with the correct bolt pattern for their application.

I also had to open the center hole up to a tick over 3.5" for my hubs. Here are the hats after doing that operation:



And here is a hat on a hub after drilling the 6 on 5" pattern to go over the drive pins.



I typically only run three pins in the front to save a bit of weight.

And here they are with rotors installed:





I really like these rotors. They're directional, and there is not a sharp edge to be found anywhere on them. The vanes are also back cut a bit on the outside to trim a bit of weight. Really nice stuff.
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  #33  
Old 11-20-2013, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
I really like these rotors. They're directional, and there is not a sharp edge to be found anywhere on them. The vanes are also back cut a bit on the outside to trim a bit of weight. Really nice stuff.
...not a hole except the mounting ones...
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  #34  
Old 11-20-2013, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by entropy View Post
...not a hole except the mounting ones...
Yep. And if you have the $$$, it looks like Performance Friction has a rotor and hat setup that even gets rid of those.

http://www.performancefriction.com/m...s/v3-disc.aspx
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  #35  
Old 11-20-2013, 01:55 PM
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I decided to use Wilwood's Dynapro radial mount calipers on the front end. These are a pretty compact caliper that take the same size pad as their Dynalite line, but are a little longer, which should translate to better rigidity because it gets the bolts that hold the caliper halves together down closer to the center of the pistons.

Of course nobody makes a bracket to attach these to sprint car spindle with an 11.75" rotor, so I designed and made these:



The brackets started out as 3/4" x 3" 6061 bar stock. There is a 0.040" offset built into them to move the caliper out to where it is centered on the rotor, which means I have a left and a right bracket. I was hoping to be able to use the same bracket on both sides, but it didn't work out. If my offset was "in" instead of "out", I could have machined a little bit off the hats and been good.

Here's another shot:



I found out that the lower mounting bolt interferes with the rotor-to-hat bolts when everything is assembled. This means I'm going to end up tapping one of the mounting lugs on each spindle for a Keensert so there isn't a nut or bolt head on the outside.

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  #36  
Old 11-22-2013, 02:10 PM
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I've gotten a pretty decent start on my steering arms the past couple nights, so I figured I would post up some progress.

These started as a 1-1/2" x 3" x 8-1/4" block of 6061. The reason for starting with such a large chunk is because they put the outer tie rod end in double shear, plus there needs to be enough material to go around the upper kingpin boss on the spindles.

Here's a shot after the first couple setups. All the mounting holes are drilled, and the slot for the tie rod end has been cut.



And another view:



The tie rod slot looks a little funny in this picture because I didn't have a long enough end mill to finish it all the way to the outside. It's OK, though, because quite a bit of the material that's on the top surface in this picture will end up getting cut off when the final profile is cut out.

The next step was to cut 1/4" off the top and bottom except in the area of the tie rod end.



Then, I made a series of cuts to approximate a 3/4" radius to transition from the tie rod end to the main body of the steering arm.



I did a layout in CAD to get the coordinates, then made the cuts with a 1/4" ball end mill. Here's a closeup of the resulting surface.



Once I get the arms finished, I'll smooth off the ridges with a file.

Here's the final side view profile after both sides have been done.



I just need to get the other three arms (I'm making two sets) to this point, and I'll be ready to set up the rotary table to do the top view profile.

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  #37  
Old 11-22-2013, 02:19 PM
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this is taking way to long hurry up dieing to see finished pics lol
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  #38  
Old 11-22-2013, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham08 View Post
Is it just the photo or are you getting an edge along one side of each pass from the larger end mill cut used to make the flat top/left surface shown in the photo? Is that a tram / nod issue on your mill or perhaps a depth of cut change?
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Last edited by TheBandit; 11-22-2013 at 06:48 PM.
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  #39  
Old 11-22-2013, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBandit View Post
Is it just the photo or are you getting an edge along one side of each pass from the larger end mill cut used to make the flat top/left surface shown in the photo? Is that a tram / nod issue on your mill or perhaps a depth of cut change?
The photo exaggerates it a bit, but there is just a little ridge there. I don't think it is tram because it is not consistent front to back. It is almost like the quill is sucking down just a little bit or the mill may be slipping in the collet. It's not consistent part to part either. Just more file work when I finish them up!
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  #40  
Old 11-23-2013, 07:31 PM
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I figured out what was causing that ridge. Originally I was cutting that surface in one 0.250" cut. Changing to a 0.200" roughing cut and a 0.050" finish cut gets rid of it. Apparently one large cut causes enough deflection in the end mill that the passes don't match when reversing direction.
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